On extractors, error-correction and hiding all partial information

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Randomness extractors [12] allow one to obtain nearly perfect randomness from highly imperfect sources randomness, which are only known to contain "scattered" entropy. Not surprisingly, such extractors have found numerous applications in many areas of computer science including cryptography. Aside from extracting randomness, a less known usage of extractors comes from the fact that they hide all deterministic functions of their (high-entropy) input [6]: in other words, extractors provide certain level of privacy for the imperfect source that they use. In the latter kind of applications, one typically needs extra properties of extractors, such as invertibility, collision-resistance or error-correction. In this abstract we survey some of such usages of extractors, concentrating on several recent results by the author [5], [6], [7]. The primitives we will survey include several flavors of randomness extractors, entropically secure encryption and perfect one-way hash functions. The main technical tools will include several variants of the leftover hash lemma, error correcting codes, and the connection between randomness extraction and hiding all partial information. Due to space constraints, many important references and results are not mentioned here; interested reader can find those in [5], [6], [7].

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2005 IEEE Information Theory Workshop on Theory and Practice in Information-Theoretic Security
Pages74-79
Number of pages6
Volume2005
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005
Event2005 IEEE Information Theory Workshop on Theory and Practice in Information-Theoretic Security - Awaiji Island, Japan
Duration: Oct 16 2005Oct 19 2005

Other

Other2005 IEEE Information Theory Workshop on Theory and Practice in Information-Theoretic Security
CountryJapan
CityAwaiji Island
Period10/16/0510/19/05

Fingerprint

Error correction
Cryptography
Entropy
Hash functions
Flavors
Computer science

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Dodis, Y. (2005). On extractors, error-correction and hiding all partial information. In 2005 IEEE Information Theory Workshop on Theory and Practice in Information-Theoretic Security (Vol. 2005, pp. 74-79). [1543961] https://doi.org/10.1109/ITWTPI.2005.1543961

On extractors, error-correction and hiding all partial information. / Dodis, Yevgeniy.

2005 IEEE Information Theory Workshop on Theory and Practice in Information-Theoretic Security. Vol. 2005 2005. p. 74-79 1543961.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Dodis, Y 2005, On extractors, error-correction and hiding all partial information. in 2005 IEEE Information Theory Workshop on Theory and Practice in Information-Theoretic Security. vol. 2005, 1543961, pp. 74-79, 2005 IEEE Information Theory Workshop on Theory and Practice in Information-Theoretic Security, Awaiji Island, Japan, 10/16/05. https://doi.org/10.1109/ITWTPI.2005.1543961
Dodis Y. On extractors, error-correction and hiding all partial information. In 2005 IEEE Information Theory Workshop on Theory and Practice in Information-Theoretic Security. Vol. 2005. 2005. p. 74-79. 1543961 https://doi.org/10.1109/ITWTPI.2005.1543961
Dodis, Yevgeniy. / On extractors, error-correction and hiding all partial information. 2005 IEEE Information Theory Workshop on Theory and Practice in Information-Theoretic Security. Vol. 2005 2005. pp. 74-79
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