Older adults' concerns about cognitive health

Commonalities and differences among six United States ethnic groups

James N. Laditka, Sarah B. Laditka, Rui Liu, Anna E. Price, Bei Wu, Daniela B. Friedman, Sara J. Corwin, Joseph R. Sharkey, Winston Tseng, Rebecca Hunter, Rebecca G. Logsdon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We studied concerns about cognitive health among ethnically diverse groups of older adults. The study was grounded in theories of health behaviour and the representation of health and illness. We conducted 42 focus groups (N=396, ages 50+) in four languages, with African Americans, American Indians, Chinese Americans, Latinos, Whites other than Latinos (hereafter, Whites) and Vietnamese Americans, in nine United States locations. Participants discussed concerns about keeping their memory or ability to think as they age. Audio recordings were transcribed verbatim. Constant comparison methods identified themes. In findings, all ethnic groups expressed concern and fear about memory loss, losing independence, and becoming a burden. Knowing someone with Alzheimer's disease increased concern. American Indians, Chinese Americans, Latinos and Vietnamese Americans expected memory loss. American Indians, Chinese Americans and Vietnamese Americans were concerned about stigma associated with Alzheimer's disease. Only African Americans, Chinese and Whites expressed concern about genetic risks. Only African Americans and Whites expressed concern about behaviour changes. Although we asked participants for their thoughts about their ability to think as they age, they focused almost exclusively on memory. This suggests that health education promoting cognitive health should focus on memory, but should also educate the public about the importance of maintaining all aspects of cognitive health.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1202-1228
Number of pages27
JournalAgeing and Society
Volume31
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2011

Fingerprint

Asian Americans
Ethnic Groups
ethnic group
American Indian
North American Indians
Health
health
Hispanic Americans
African Americans
Aptitude
dementia
Memory Disorders
Alzheimer Disease
ability
health behavior
health promotion
Health Behavior
recording
Focus Groups
Health Education

Keywords

  • ageing
  • Alzheimer's disease
  • brain health
  • cognition
  • dementia
  • focus groups
  • memory
  • qualitative research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Social Psychology

Cite this

Laditka, J. N., Laditka, S. B., Liu, R., Price, A. E., Wu, B., Friedman, D. B., ... Logsdon, R. G. (2011). Older adults' concerns about cognitive health: Commonalities and differences among six United States ethnic groups. Ageing and Society, 31(7), 1202-1228. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0144686X10001273

Older adults' concerns about cognitive health : Commonalities and differences among six United States ethnic groups. / Laditka, James N.; Laditka, Sarah B.; Liu, Rui; Price, Anna E.; Wu, Bei; Friedman, Daniela B.; Corwin, Sara J.; Sharkey, Joseph R.; Tseng, Winston; Hunter, Rebecca; Logsdon, Rebecca G.

In: Ageing and Society, Vol. 31, No. 7, 10.2011, p. 1202-1228.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Laditka, JN, Laditka, SB, Liu, R, Price, AE, Wu, B, Friedman, DB, Corwin, SJ, Sharkey, JR, Tseng, W, Hunter, R & Logsdon, RG 2011, 'Older adults' concerns about cognitive health: Commonalities and differences among six United States ethnic groups', Ageing and Society, vol. 31, no. 7, pp. 1202-1228. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0144686X10001273
Laditka, James N. ; Laditka, Sarah B. ; Liu, Rui ; Price, Anna E. ; Wu, Bei ; Friedman, Daniela B. ; Corwin, Sara J. ; Sharkey, Joseph R. ; Tseng, Winston ; Hunter, Rebecca ; Logsdon, Rebecca G. / Older adults' concerns about cognitive health : Commonalities and differences among six United States ethnic groups. In: Ageing and Society. 2011 ; Vol. 31, No. 7. pp. 1202-1228.
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