NREM sleep in the rodent neocortex and hippocampus reflects excitable dynamics

Daniel Levenstein, György Buzsáki, John Rinzel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

During non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, neuronal populations in the mammalian forebrain alternate between periods of spiking and inactivity. Termed the slow oscillation in the neocortex and sharp wave-ripples in the hippocampus, these alternations are often considered separately but are both crucial for NREM functions. By directly comparing experimental observations of naturally-sleeping rats with a mean field model of an adapting, recurrent neuronal population, we find that the neocortical alternations reflect a dynamical regime in which a stable active state is interrupted by transient inactive states (slow waves) while the hippocampal alternations reflect a stable inactive state interrupted by transient active states (sharp waves). We propose that during NREM sleep in the rodent, hippocampal and neocortical populations are excitable: each in a stable state from which internal fluctuations or external perturbation can evoke the stereotyped population events that mediate NREM functions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number2478
JournalNature Communications
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2019

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eye movements
hippocampus
sleep
rodents
Eye movements
Neocortex
Eye Movements
Rodentia
Hippocampus
Sleep
alternations
Population
spiking
Prosencephalon
ripples
rats
Rats
perturbation
oscillations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

NREM sleep in the rodent neocortex and hippocampus reflects excitable dynamics. / Levenstein, Daniel; Buzsáki, György; Rinzel, John.

In: Nature Communications, Vol. 10, No. 1, 2478, 01.12.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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