No association between arsenic exposure from drinking water and diabetes mellitus: A cross-sectional study in Bangladesh

Yu Chen, Habibul Ahsan, Vesna Slavkovich, Gretchen Loeffler Peltier, Rebecca T. Gluskin, Faruque Parvez, Xinhua Liu, Joseph H. Graziano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: The long-term effects of arsenic exposure from drinking water at levels < 300 μg/L and the risk of diabetes mellitus remains a controversial topic. Method: We conducted a population-based cross-sectional study using baseline data from 11,319 participants in the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study in Araihazar, Bangladesh, to evaluate the associations of well water arsenic and total urinary arsenic concentration and the prevalence of diabetes mellitus and glucosuria. We also assessed the concentrations of well water arsenic, total urinary arsenic, and urinary arsenic metabolites in relation to blood glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels in subsets of the study population. Results: More than 90% of the cohort members were exposed to drinking water with arsenic concentration < 300 μg/L. We found no association between arsenic exposure and the prevalence of diabetes. The adjusted odds ratios for diabetes were 1.00 (referent), 1.35 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.90-2.02], 1.24 (0.82-1.87), 0.96 (0.62-1.49), and 1.11 (0.73-1.69) in relation to quintiles of time-weighted water arsenic concentrations of 0.1-8, 8-41, 41-91, 92-176, and ≥ 177 μg/L, respectively, and 1.00 (referent), 1.29 (0.87-1.91), 1.05 (0.69-1.59), 0.94 (0.61-1.44), and 0.93 (0.59-1.45) in relation to quintiles of urinary arsenic concentrations of 1-36, 37-66, 67-114, 115-204, and ≥ 205 μg/L, respectively. We observed no association between arsenic exposure and prevalence of glucosuria and no evidence of an association between well water arsenic, total urinary arsenic, or the composition of urinary arsenic metabolites and HbA1c level. Conclusions: Our findings do not support an association of arsenic exposure from drinking water and a significantly increased risk of diabetes mellitus in the range of levels observed. Further prospective studies would be valuable in confirming the findings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1299-1305
Number of pages7
JournalEnvironmental Health Perspectives
Volume118
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2010

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Bangladesh
Arsenic
Drinking Water
Diabetes Mellitus
Cross-Sectional Studies
Water
Glycosylated Hemoglobin A

Keywords

  • Arsenic exposure
  • Bangladesh
  • Cross-sectional studies
  • Diabetes
  • Environmental epidemiology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

No association between arsenic exposure from drinking water and diabetes mellitus : A cross-sectional study in Bangladesh. / Chen, Yu; Ahsan, Habibul; Slavkovich, Vesna; Peltier, Gretchen Loeffler; Gluskin, Rebecca T.; Parvez, Faruque; Liu, Xinhua; Graziano, Joseph H.

In: Environmental Health Perspectives, Vol. 118, No. 9, 09.2010, p. 1299-1305.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chen, Y, Ahsan, H, Slavkovich, V, Peltier, GL, Gluskin, RT, Parvez, F, Liu, X & Graziano, JH 2010, 'No association between arsenic exposure from drinking water and diabetes mellitus: A cross-sectional study in Bangladesh', Environmental Health Perspectives, vol. 118, no. 9, pp. 1299-1305. https://doi.org/10.1289/ehp.0901559
Chen, Yu ; Ahsan, Habibul ; Slavkovich, Vesna ; Peltier, Gretchen Loeffler ; Gluskin, Rebecca T. ; Parvez, Faruque ; Liu, Xinhua ; Graziano, Joseph H. / No association between arsenic exposure from drinking water and diabetes mellitus : A cross-sectional study in Bangladesh. In: Environmental Health Perspectives. 2010 ; Vol. 118, No. 9. pp. 1299-1305.
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abstract = "Background: The long-term effects of arsenic exposure from drinking water at levels < 300 μg/L and the risk of diabetes mellitus remains a controversial topic. Method: We conducted a population-based cross-sectional study using baseline data from 11,319 participants in the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study in Araihazar, Bangladesh, to evaluate the associations of well water arsenic and total urinary arsenic concentration and the prevalence of diabetes mellitus and glucosuria. We also assessed the concentrations of well water arsenic, total urinary arsenic, and urinary arsenic metabolites in relation to blood glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels in subsets of the study population. Results: More than 90{\%} of the cohort members were exposed to drinking water with arsenic concentration < 300 μg/L. We found no association between arsenic exposure and the prevalence of diabetes. The adjusted odds ratios for diabetes were 1.00 (referent), 1.35 [95{\%} confidence interval (CI), 0.90-2.02], 1.24 (0.82-1.87), 0.96 (0.62-1.49), and 1.11 (0.73-1.69) in relation to quintiles of time-weighted water arsenic concentrations of 0.1-8, 8-41, 41-91, 92-176, and ≥ 177 μg/L, respectively, and 1.00 (referent), 1.29 (0.87-1.91), 1.05 (0.69-1.59), 0.94 (0.61-1.44), and 0.93 (0.59-1.45) in relation to quintiles of urinary arsenic concentrations of 1-36, 37-66, 67-114, 115-204, and ≥ 205 μg/L, respectively. We observed no association between arsenic exposure and prevalence of glucosuria and no evidence of an association between well water arsenic, total urinary arsenic, or the composition of urinary arsenic metabolites and HbA1c level. Conclusions: Our findings do not support an association of arsenic exposure from drinking water and a significantly increased risk of diabetes mellitus in the range of levels observed. Further prospective studies would be valuable in confirming the findings.",
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AU - Chen, Yu

AU - Ahsan, Habibul

AU - Slavkovich, Vesna

AU - Peltier, Gretchen Loeffler

AU - Gluskin, Rebecca T.

AU - Parvez, Faruque

AU - Liu, Xinhua

AU - Graziano, Joseph H.

PY - 2010/9

Y1 - 2010/9

N2 - Background: The long-term effects of arsenic exposure from drinking water at levels < 300 μg/L and the risk of diabetes mellitus remains a controversial topic. Method: We conducted a population-based cross-sectional study using baseline data from 11,319 participants in the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study in Araihazar, Bangladesh, to evaluate the associations of well water arsenic and total urinary arsenic concentration and the prevalence of diabetes mellitus and glucosuria. We also assessed the concentrations of well water arsenic, total urinary arsenic, and urinary arsenic metabolites in relation to blood glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels in subsets of the study population. Results: More than 90% of the cohort members were exposed to drinking water with arsenic concentration < 300 μg/L. We found no association between arsenic exposure and the prevalence of diabetes. The adjusted odds ratios for diabetes were 1.00 (referent), 1.35 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.90-2.02], 1.24 (0.82-1.87), 0.96 (0.62-1.49), and 1.11 (0.73-1.69) in relation to quintiles of time-weighted water arsenic concentrations of 0.1-8, 8-41, 41-91, 92-176, and ≥ 177 μg/L, respectively, and 1.00 (referent), 1.29 (0.87-1.91), 1.05 (0.69-1.59), 0.94 (0.61-1.44), and 0.93 (0.59-1.45) in relation to quintiles of urinary arsenic concentrations of 1-36, 37-66, 67-114, 115-204, and ≥ 205 μg/L, respectively. We observed no association between arsenic exposure and prevalence of glucosuria and no evidence of an association between well water arsenic, total urinary arsenic, or the composition of urinary arsenic metabolites and HbA1c level. Conclusions: Our findings do not support an association of arsenic exposure from drinking water and a significantly increased risk of diabetes mellitus in the range of levels observed. Further prospective studies would be valuable in confirming the findings.

AB - Background: The long-term effects of arsenic exposure from drinking water at levels < 300 μg/L and the risk of diabetes mellitus remains a controversial topic. Method: We conducted a population-based cross-sectional study using baseline data from 11,319 participants in the Health Effects of Arsenic Longitudinal Study in Araihazar, Bangladesh, to evaluate the associations of well water arsenic and total urinary arsenic concentration and the prevalence of diabetes mellitus and glucosuria. We also assessed the concentrations of well water arsenic, total urinary arsenic, and urinary arsenic metabolites in relation to blood glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels in subsets of the study population. Results: More than 90% of the cohort members were exposed to drinking water with arsenic concentration < 300 μg/L. We found no association between arsenic exposure and the prevalence of diabetes. The adjusted odds ratios for diabetes were 1.00 (referent), 1.35 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.90-2.02], 1.24 (0.82-1.87), 0.96 (0.62-1.49), and 1.11 (0.73-1.69) in relation to quintiles of time-weighted water arsenic concentrations of 0.1-8, 8-41, 41-91, 92-176, and ≥ 177 μg/L, respectively, and 1.00 (referent), 1.29 (0.87-1.91), 1.05 (0.69-1.59), 0.94 (0.61-1.44), and 0.93 (0.59-1.45) in relation to quintiles of urinary arsenic concentrations of 1-36, 37-66, 67-114, 115-204, and ≥ 205 μg/L, respectively. We observed no association between arsenic exposure and prevalence of glucosuria and no evidence of an association between well water arsenic, total urinary arsenic, or the composition of urinary arsenic metabolites and HbA1c level. Conclusions: Our findings do not support an association of arsenic exposure from drinking water and a significantly increased risk of diabetes mellitus in the range of levels observed. Further prospective studies would be valuable in confirming the findings.

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