Next-generation analysis of gene expression regulation-comparing the roles of synthesis and degradation

Joel McManus, Zhe Cheng, Christine Vogel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Technological advances now enable routine measurement of mRNA and protein abundances, and estimates of their rates of synthesis and degradation that inform on their values and the degree of change in response to stimuli. Importantly, more and more data on time-series experiments are emerging, e.g. of cells responding to stress, enabling first insights into a new dimension of gene expression regulation-its dynamics and how it allows for very different response signals across genes. This review discusses recently published methods and datasets, their impact on what we now know about the relationships between concentrations and synthesis rates of mRNAs and proteins in yeast and mammalian cells, their evolution, and new hypotheses on translation regulatory mechanisms generated by approaches that involve ribosome footprinting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2680-2689
Number of pages10
JournalMolecular BioSystems
Volume11
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 29 2015

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Gene Expression Regulation
Messenger RNA
Fungal Proteins
Ribosomes
Genes
Proteins
Datasets

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Next-generation analysis of gene expression regulation-comparing the roles of synthesis and degradation. / McManus, Joel; Cheng, Zhe; Vogel, Christine.

In: Molecular BioSystems, Vol. 11, No. 10, 29.07.2015, p. 2680-2689.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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