New fossils from Jebel Irhoud, Morocco and the pan-African origin of Homo sapiens

Jean Jacques Hublin, Abdelouahed Ben-Ncer, Shara Bailey, Sarah E. Freidline, Simon Neubauer, Matthew M. Skinner, Inga Bergmann, Adeline Le Cabec, Stefano Benazzi, Katerina Harvati, Philipp Gunz

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Fossil evidence points to an African origin of Homo sapiens from a group called either H. heidelbergensis or H. rhodesiensis. However, the exact place and time of emergence of H. sapiens remain obscure because the fossil record is scarce and the chronological age of many key specimens remains uncertain. In particular, it is unclear whether the present day 'modern' morphology rapidly emerged approximately 200 thousand years ago (ka) among earlier representatives of H. sapiens1 or evolved gradually over the last 400 thousand years2. Here we report newly discovered human fossils from Jebel Irhoud, Morocco, and interpret the affinities of the hominins from this site with other archaic and recent human groups. We identified a mosaic of features including facial, mandibular and dental morphology that aligns the Jebel Irhoud material with early or recent anatomically modern humans and more primitive neurocranial and endocranial morphology. In combination with an age of 315 ± 34 thousand years (as determined by thermoluminescence dating)3, this evidence makes Jebel Irhoud the oldest and richest African Middle Stone Age hominin site that documents early stages of the H. sapiens clade in which key features of modern morphology were established. Furthermore, it shows that the evolutionary processes behind the emergence of H. sapiens involved the whole African continent.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)289-292
    Number of pages4
    JournalNature
    Volume546
    Issue number7657
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jun 7 2017

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    Morocco
    Fossils
    Hominidae
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    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Medicine(all)
    • General

    Cite this

    Hublin, J. J., Ben-Ncer, A., Bailey, S., Freidline, S. E., Neubauer, S., Skinner, M. M., ... Gunz, P. (2017). New fossils from Jebel Irhoud, Morocco and the pan-African origin of Homo sapiens. Nature, 546(7657), 289-292. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature22336

    New fossils from Jebel Irhoud, Morocco and the pan-African origin of Homo sapiens. / Hublin, Jean Jacques; Ben-Ncer, Abdelouahed; Bailey, Shara; Freidline, Sarah E.; Neubauer, Simon; Skinner, Matthew M.; Bergmann, Inga; Le Cabec, Adeline; Benazzi, Stefano; Harvati, Katerina; Gunz, Philipp.

    In: Nature, Vol. 546, No. 7657, 07.06.2017, p. 289-292.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Hublin, JJ, Ben-Ncer, A, Bailey, S, Freidline, SE, Neubauer, S, Skinner, MM, Bergmann, I, Le Cabec, A, Benazzi, S, Harvati, K & Gunz, P 2017, 'New fossils from Jebel Irhoud, Morocco and the pan-African origin of Homo sapiens', Nature, vol. 546, no. 7657, pp. 289-292. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature22336
    Hublin JJ, Ben-Ncer A, Bailey S, Freidline SE, Neubauer S, Skinner MM et al. New fossils from Jebel Irhoud, Morocco and the pan-African origin of Homo sapiens. Nature. 2017 Jun 7;546(7657):289-292. https://doi.org/10.1038/nature22336
    Hublin, Jean Jacques ; Ben-Ncer, Abdelouahed ; Bailey, Shara ; Freidline, Sarah E. ; Neubauer, Simon ; Skinner, Matthew M. ; Bergmann, Inga ; Le Cabec, Adeline ; Benazzi, Stefano ; Harvati, Katerina ; Gunz, Philipp. / New fossils from Jebel Irhoud, Morocco and the pan-African origin of Homo sapiens. In: Nature. 2017 ; Vol. 546, No. 7657. pp. 289-292.
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