New design methods for activist gaming

Mary Flanagan, Daniel C. Howe, Helen Nissenbaum

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Significant work in the gaming and HCI communities has focused on systems that support human values such as privacy, trust, and community. Designers and engineers have become increasingly aware of ways in which the artifacts they create can embody political, social, and ethical values. Yet there has been little work toward producing practical methodologies that systematically incorporate values in the design process. This paper is aimed at introducing systematic methods for the iterative discovery, analysis, and integration of values into the work of game designers and technologists. It is our hope that such work will shed light on the benefits and challenges of employing a values-oriented approach across a variety of design contexts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of DiGRA 2005 Conference: Changing Views - Worlds in Play
StatePublished - 2005
Event2nd International Conference on Digital Games Research Association: Changing Views: Worlds in Play, DiGRA 2005 - Vancouver, BC, Canada
Duration: Jun 16 2005Jun 20 2005

Other

Other2nd International Conference on Digital Games Research Association: Changing Views: Worlds in Play, DiGRA 2005
CountryCanada
CityVancouver, BC
Period6/16/056/20/05

Fingerprint

Human computer interaction
Engineers

Keywords

  • Activism
  • Game design
  • Human factors
  • Pedagogy
  • Social issues
  • Values

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Software

Cite this

Flanagan, M., Howe, D. C., & Nissenbaum, H. (2005). New design methods for activist gaming. In Proceedings of DiGRA 2005 Conference: Changing Views - Worlds in Play

New design methods for activist gaming. / Flanagan, Mary; Howe, Daniel C.; Nissenbaum, Helen.

Proceedings of DiGRA 2005 Conference: Changing Views - Worlds in Play. 2005.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Flanagan, M, Howe, DC & Nissenbaum, H 2005, New design methods for activist gaming. in Proceedings of DiGRA 2005 Conference: Changing Views - Worlds in Play. 2nd International Conference on Digital Games Research Association: Changing Views: Worlds in Play, DiGRA 2005, Vancouver, BC, Canada, 6/16/05.
Flanagan M, Howe DC, Nissenbaum H. New design methods for activist gaming. In Proceedings of DiGRA 2005 Conference: Changing Views - Worlds in Play. 2005
Flanagan, Mary ; Howe, Daniel C. ; Nissenbaum, Helen. / New design methods for activist gaming. Proceedings of DiGRA 2005 Conference: Changing Views - Worlds in Play. 2005.
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