Neuronal coupling by endogenous electric fields: Cable theory and applications to coincidence detector neurons in the auditory brain stem

Joshua H. Goldwyn, John Rinzel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The ongoing activity of neurons generates a spatially and time-varying field of extracellular voltage (Ve). This Ve field reflects populationlevel neural activity, but does it modulate neural dynamics and the function of neural circuits? We provide a cable theory framework to study how a bundle of model neurons generates Ve and how this Ve feeds back and influences membrane potential (Vm). We find that these "ephaptic interactions" are small but not negligible. The model neural population can generate Ve with millivolt-scale amplitude, and this Ve perturbs the Vm of "nearby" cables and effectively increases their electrotonic length. After using passive cable theory to systematically study ephaptic coupling, we explore a test case: the medial superior olive (MSO) in the auditory brain stem. The MSO is a possible locus of ephaptic interactions: sounds evoke large (millivolt scale) Ve in vivo in this nucleus. The Ve response is thought to be generated by MSO neurons that perform a known neuronal computation with submillisecond temporal precision (coincidence detection to encode sound source location). Using a biophysically based model of MSO neurons, we find millivolt-scale ephaptic interactions consistent with the passive cable theory results. These subtle membrane potential perturbations induce changes in spike initiation threshold, spike time synchrony, and time difference sensitivity. These results suggest that ephaptic coupling may influence MSO function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2033-2051
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Neurophysiology
Volume115
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2016

Fingerprint

Brain Stem
Neurons
Membrane Potentials
Superior Olivary Complex
Population

Keywords

  • Cable theory
  • Coincidence detection
  • Ephaptic coupling
  • Field potential
  • Medial superior olive

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Physiology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Neuronal coupling by endogenous electric fields : Cable theory and applications to coincidence detector neurons in the auditory brain stem. / Goldwyn, Joshua H.; Rinzel, John.

In: Journal of Neurophysiology, Vol. 115, No. 4, 01.04.2016, p. 2033-2051.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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