Neighborhoods and obesity in New York City

Jennifer L. Black, James Macinko, L. Beth Dixon, George E. Fryer,

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Recent studies reveal disparities in neighborhood access to food and fitness facilities, particularly in US cities; but few studies assess the effects of multiple neighborhood factors on obesity. This study measured the multilevel relations between neighborhood food availability, opportunities and barriers for physical activity, income and racial composition with obesity (BMI≥30 kg/m2) in New York City, controlling for individual-level factors. Obesity rates varied widely between neighborhoods, ranging from 6.8% to 31.7%. Obesity was significantly (p<0.01) associated with neighborhood-level factors, particularly the availability of supermarkets and food stores, fitness facilities, percent of commercial land use and area income. These findings are consistent with the growing literature showing that area income and availability of food and physical activity resources are related to obesity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)489-499
Number of pages11
JournalHealth and Place
Volume16
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2010

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obesity
Obesity
food
Food
physical activity
income
fitness
food availability
land use
city
resource
resources

Keywords

  • Food availability
  • Multilevel model
  • Neighborhood
  • Obesity
  • Physical activity environment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

Black, J. L., Macinko, J., Dixon, L. B., & Fryer, G. E. (2010). Neighborhoods and obesity in New York City. Health and Place, 16(3), 489-499. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.healthplace.2009.12.007

Neighborhoods and obesity in New York City. / Black, Jennifer L.; Macinko, James; Dixon, L. Beth; Fryer, George E.

In: Health and Place, Vol. 16, No. 3, 05.2010, p. 489-499.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Black, JL, Macinko, J, Dixon, LB & Fryer, GE 2010, 'Neighborhoods and obesity in New York City', Health and Place, vol. 16, no. 3, pp. 489-499. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.healthplace.2009.12.007
Black, Jennifer L. ; Macinko, James ; Dixon, L. Beth ; Fryer, George E. / Neighborhoods and obesity in New York City. In: Health and Place. 2010 ; Vol. 16, No. 3. pp. 489-499.
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