Neighborhood-level LGBT hate crimes and current illicit drug use among sexual minority youth

Dustin Duncan, Mark L. Hatzenbuehler, Renee M. Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To investigate whether past-30 day illicit drug use among sexual minority youth was more common in neighborhoods with a greater prevalence of hate crimes targeting lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT, or sexual minority) individuals. Methods: We used a population-based survey of public school youth in Boston, Massachusetts, consisting of 1292 9th-12th grade students from the 2008 Boston Youth Survey Geospatial Dataset (sexual minority n= 108). Data on LGBT hate crimes involving assaults or assaults and battery between 2005 and 2008 were obtained from the Boston Police Department and linked to youths' residential address. Youth reported past-30 day use of marijuana and other illicit drugs. Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney tests and corresponding p-values were computed to assess differences in substance use by neighborhood-level LGBT assault hate crime rate among sexual minority youth (n= 103). Results: The LGBT assault hate crime rate in the neighborhoods of sexual minority youth who reported current marijuana use was 23.7 per 100,000, compared to 12.9 per 100,000 for sexual minority youth who reported no marijuana use (p= 0.04). No associations between LGBT assault hate crimes and marijuana use among heterosexual youth (p>. 0.05) or between sexual minority marijuana use and overall neighborhood-level violent and property crimes (p>. 0.05) were detected, providing evidence for result specificity. Conclusions: We found a significantly greater prevalence of marijuana use among sexual minority youth in neighborhoods with a higher prevalence of LGBT assault hate crimes. These results suggest that neighborhood context (i.e., LGBT hate crimes) may contribute to sexual orientation disparities in marijuana use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)65-70
Number of pages6
JournalDrug and Alcohol Dependence
Volume135
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Hate
Crime
Street Drugs
Cannabis
Sexual Minorities
Law enforcement
Transgender Persons
Heterosexuality
Police
Students
Sexual Behavior

Keywords

  • Illicit drug use
  • LGBT assault hate crimes
  • Marijuana use
  • Sexual orientation
  • Social determinants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Toxicology
  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Neighborhood-level LGBT hate crimes and current illicit drug use among sexual minority youth. / Duncan, Dustin; Hatzenbuehler, Mark L.; Johnson, Renee M.

In: Drug and Alcohol Dependence, Vol. 135, No. 1, 2014, p. 65-70.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Duncan, Dustin ; Hatzenbuehler, Mark L. ; Johnson, Renee M. / Neighborhood-level LGBT hate crimes and current illicit drug use among sexual minority youth. In: Drug and Alcohol Dependence. 2014 ; Vol. 135, No. 1. pp. 65-70.
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