Negotiation from a near and distant time perspective

Marlone D. Henderson, Yaacov Trope, Peter J. Carnevale

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Across 3 experiments, the authors examined the effects of temporal distance on negotiation behavior. They found that greater temporal distance from negotiation decreased preference for piecemeal, single-issue consideration over integrative, multi-issue consideration (Experiment 1). They also found that greater temporal distance from an event being negotiated increased interest in conceding on the lowest priority issue and decreased interest in conceding on the highest priority issue (Experiment 2). Lastly, they found increased temporal distance from an event being negotiated produced a greater proportion of multi-issue offers, a greater likelihood of conceding on the lowest priority issue in exchange for a concession on the highest priority issue, and greater individual and joint outcomes (Experiment 3). Implications for conflict resolution and construal level theory are discussed. Copyright by the 2006 American Psychological Association.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)712-729
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Personality and Social Psychology
Volume91
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2006

Fingerprint

Negotiating
experiment
event
concession
conflict resolution
time

Keywords

  • Conflict resolution
  • Construal
  • Integrative
  • Negotiation
  • Psychological distance
  • Time

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Negotiation from a near and distant time perspective. / Henderson, Marlone D.; Trope, Yaacov; Carnevale, Peter J.

In: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Vol. 91, No. 4, 10.2006, p. 712-729.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Henderson, Marlone D. ; Trope, Yaacov ; Carnevale, Peter J. / Negotiation from a near and distant time perspective. In: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 2006 ; Vol. 91, No. 4. pp. 712-729.
@article{643f7ed3ce1446dc941e77961bfb7651,
title = "Negotiation from a near and distant time perspective",
abstract = "Across 3 experiments, the authors examined the effects of temporal distance on negotiation behavior. They found that greater temporal distance from negotiation decreased preference for piecemeal, single-issue consideration over integrative, multi-issue consideration (Experiment 1). They also found that greater temporal distance from an event being negotiated increased interest in conceding on the lowest priority issue and decreased interest in conceding on the highest priority issue (Experiment 2). Lastly, they found increased temporal distance from an event being negotiated produced a greater proportion of multi-issue offers, a greater likelihood of conceding on the lowest priority issue in exchange for a concession on the highest priority issue, and greater individual and joint outcomes (Experiment 3). Implications for conflict resolution and construal level theory are discussed. Copyright by the 2006 American Psychological Association.",
keywords = "Conflict resolution, Construal, Integrative, Negotiation, Psychological distance, Time",
author = "Henderson, {Marlone D.} and Yaacov Trope and Carnevale, {Peter J.}",
year = "2006",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1037/0022-3514.91.4.712",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "91",
pages = "712--729",
journal = "Journal of Personality and Social Psychology",
issn = "0022-3514",
publisher = "American Psychological Association Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Negotiation from a near and distant time perspective

AU - Henderson, Marlone D.

AU - Trope, Yaacov

AU - Carnevale, Peter J.

PY - 2006/10

Y1 - 2006/10

N2 - Across 3 experiments, the authors examined the effects of temporal distance on negotiation behavior. They found that greater temporal distance from negotiation decreased preference for piecemeal, single-issue consideration over integrative, multi-issue consideration (Experiment 1). They also found that greater temporal distance from an event being negotiated increased interest in conceding on the lowest priority issue and decreased interest in conceding on the highest priority issue (Experiment 2). Lastly, they found increased temporal distance from an event being negotiated produced a greater proportion of multi-issue offers, a greater likelihood of conceding on the lowest priority issue in exchange for a concession on the highest priority issue, and greater individual and joint outcomes (Experiment 3). Implications for conflict resolution and construal level theory are discussed. Copyright by the 2006 American Psychological Association.

AB - Across 3 experiments, the authors examined the effects of temporal distance on negotiation behavior. They found that greater temporal distance from negotiation decreased preference for piecemeal, single-issue consideration over integrative, multi-issue consideration (Experiment 1). They also found that greater temporal distance from an event being negotiated increased interest in conceding on the lowest priority issue and decreased interest in conceding on the highest priority issue (Experiment 2). Lastly, they found increased temporal distance from an event being negotiated produced a greater proportion of multi-issue offers, a greater likelihood of conceding on the lowest priority issue in exchange for a concession on the highest priority issue, and greater individual and joint outcomes (Experiment 3). Implications for conflict resolution and construal level theory are discussed. Copyright by the 2006 American Psychological Association.

KW - Conflict resolution

KW - Construal

KW - Integrative

KW - Negotiation

KW - Psychological distance

KW - Time

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33750149247&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33750149247&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1037/0022-3514.91.4.712

DO - 10.1037/0022-3514.91.4.712

M3 - Article

C2 - 17014295

AN - SCOPUS:33750149247

VL - 91

SP - 712

EP - 729

JO - Journal of Personality and Social Psychology

JF - Journal of Personality and Social Psychology

SN - 0022-3514

IS - 4

ER -