Natural Disasters and the Size of Nations

Muhammet Bas, Elena V. McLean

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

What is the relationship between natural disasters and country size? Is an increasing likelihood of environmental shocks linked to political integration or secessionism? We argue that natural disasters are associated with a decline in country size. This relationship arises because costs generated by disasters are higher for citizens located farther away from the political center of a country, and costs are amplified as disasters affect a larger area in a country, which in turn makes it less desirable for citizens in remote regions to remain part of a larger country. Our empirical results show that greater risks of environmental shocks are indeed associated with smaller countries, as well as smaller administrative units.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)677-702
Number of pages26
JournalInternational Interactions
Volume42
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 19 2016

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disaster
natural disaster
political center
citizen
political integration
costs

Keywords

  • Country size
  • natural disasters

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Political Science and International Relations

Cite this

Natural Disasters and the Size of Nations. / Bas, Muhammet; McLean, Elena V.

In: International Interactions, Vol. 42, No. 5, 19.10.2016, p. 677-702.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bas, Muhammet ; McLean, Elena V. / Natural Disasters and the Size of Nations. In: International Interactions. 2016 ; Vol. 42, No. 5. pp. 677-702.
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