Multiresolution identification of germ layer components in teratomas derived from human and nonhuman primate embryonic stem cells

Amina Chebira, John A. Ozolek, Carlos A. Castro, William G. Jenkinson, Mukta Gore, Ramamurthy Bhagavatula, Irina Khaimovich, Shauna E. Ormon, Christopher S. Navara, Meena Sukhwani, Kyle E. Orwig, Ahmi Ben-Yehudah, Gerald Schatten, Gustavo K. Rohde, Jelena Kovacevic

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

We propose a system for identification of germ layer components in teratomas derived from human and nonhuman primate embryonic stem cells. Tissue regeneration and repair, drug testing and discovery, the cure of genetic and developmental syndromes all may rest on the understanding of the biology and behavior of embryonic stem (ES) cells. Within the field of stem cell biology, an ES cell is not considered an ES cell until it can produce a teratoma tumor (the "gold" standard test); a seemingly disorganized mass of tissue derived from all three embryonic germ layers; ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm. Identification and quantification of tissue types within teratomas derived from ES cells may expand our knowledge of abnormal and normal developmental programming and the response of ES cells to genetic manipulation and/or toxic exposures. In addition, because of the tissue complexity, identifying and quantifying the tissue is tedious and time consuming, but in turn the teratoma provides an excellent biological platform to test robust image analysis algorithms. We use a multiresolution (MR) classification system with texture features, as well as develop novel nuclear texture features to recognize germ layer components. With redundant MR transform, we achieve a classification accuracy of approximately 88%.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2008 5th IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging
Subtitle of host publicationFrom Nano to Macro, Proceedings, ISBI
Pages979-982
Number of pages4
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 10 2008
Event2008 5th IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: From Nano to Macro, ISBI - Paris, France
Duration: May 14 2008May 17 2008

Other

Other2008 5th IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: From Nano to Macro, ISBI
CountryFrance
CityParis
Period5/14/085/17/08

Fingerprint

Stem cells
Tissue
Textures
Cytology
Tissue regeneration
Primates
Image analysis
Tumors
Repair
Gold
Testing

Keywords

  • Classification
  • Feature extraction
  • Multiresolution
  • Stem cell biology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Chebira, A., Ozolek, J. A., Castro, C. A., Jenkinson, W. G., Gore, M., Bhagavatula, R., ... Kovacevic, J. (2008). Multiresolution identification of germ layer components in teratomas derived from human and nonhuman primate embryonic stem cells. In 2008 5th IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: From Nano to Macro, Proceedings, ISBI (pp. 979-982). [4541162] https://doi.org/10.1109/ISBI.2008.4541162

Multiresolution identification of germ layer components in teratomas derived from human and nonhuman primate embryonic stem cells. / Chebira, Amina; Ozolek, John A.; Castro, Carlos A.; Jenkinson, William G.; Gore, Mukta; Bhagavatula, Ramamurthy; Khaimovich, Irina; Ormon, Shauna E.; Navara, Christopher S.; Sukhwani, Meena; Orwig, Kyle E.; Ben-Yehudah, Ahmi; Schatten, Gerald; Rohde, Gustavo K.; Kovacevic, Jelena.

2008 5th IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: From Nano to Macro, Proceedings, ISBI. 2008. p. 979-982 4541162.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Chebira, A, Ozolek, JA, Castro, CA, Jenkinson, WG, Gore, M, Bhagavatula, R, Khaimovich, I, Ormon, SE, Navara, CS, Sukhwani, M, Orwig, KE, Ben-Yehudah, A, Schatten, G, Rohde, GK & Kovacevic, J 2008, Multiresolution identification of germ layer components in teratomas derived from human and nonhuman primate embryonic stem cells. in 2008 5th IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: From Nano to Macro, Proceedings, ISBI., 4541162, pp. 979-982, 2008 5th IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: From Nano to Macro, ISBI, Paris, France, 5/14/08. https://doi.org/10.1109/ISBI.2008.4541162
Chebira A, Ozolek JA, Castro CA, Jenkinson WG, Gore M, Bhagavatula R et al. Multiresolution identification of germ layer components in teratomas derived from human and nonhuman primate embryonic stem cells. In 2008 5th IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: From Nano to Macro, Proceedings, ISBI. 2008. p. 979-982. 4541162 https://doi.org/10.1109/ISBI.2008.4541162
Chebira, Amina ; Ozolek, John A. ; Castro, Carlos A. ; Jenkinson, William G. ; Gore, Mukta ; Bhagavatula, Ramamurthy ; Khaimovich, Irina ; Ormon, Shauna E. ; Navara, Christopher S. ; Sukhwani, Meena ; Orwig, Kyle E. ; Ben-Yehudah, Ahmi ; Schatten, Gerald ; Rohde, Gustavo K. ; Kovacevic, Jelena. / Multiresolution identification of germ layer components in teratomas derived from human and nonhuman primate embryonic stem cells. 2008 5th IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging: From Nano to Macro, Proceedings, ISBI. 2008. pp. 979-982
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