Multiple method contraception use among African American adolescents in four US cities

Jennifer L. Brown, Michael Hennessy, Jessica M. Sales, Ralph DiClemente, Laura F. Salazar, Peter A. Vanable, Michael P. Carey, Daniel Romer, Robert F. Valois, Larry K. Brown, Bonita Stanton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We report on African American adolescents' (N = 850; M age = 15.4) contraceptive practices and type of contraception utilized during their last sexual encounter. Respondents completed measures of demographics, contraceptive use, sexual partner type, and ability to select safe sexual partners. 40 endorsed use of dual or multiple contraceptive methods; a total of 35 different contraceptive combinations were reported. Perceived ability to select safe partners was associated with not using contraception (OR = 1.25), using less effective contraceptive methods (OR = 1.23), or hormonal birth control (OR = 1.50). Female gender predicted hormonal birth control use (OR = 2.33), use of less effective contraceptive methods (e.g., withdrawal; OR = 2.47), and using no contraception (OR = 2.37). Respondents' age and partner type did not predict contraception use. Adolescents used contraceptive methods with limited ability to prevent both unintended pregnancies and STD/HIV. Adolescents who believed their partners posed low risk were more likely to use contraceptive practices other than condoms or no contraception. Reproductive health practitioners are encouraged to help youth negotiate contraceptive use with partners, regardless of the partner's perceived riskiness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number765917
JournalInfectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume2011
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 16 2011

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Contraception
African Americans
Contraceptive Agents
Sexual Partners
Reproductive Health
Condoms
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Demography
HIV
Pregnancy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Multiple method contraception use among African American adolescents in four US cities. / Brown, Jennifer L.; Hennessy, Michael; Sales, Jessica M.; DiClemente, Ralph; Salazar, Laura F.; Vanable, Peter A.; Carey, Michael P.; Romer, Daniel; Valois, Robert F.; Brown, Larry K.; Stanton, Bonita.

In: Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 2011, 765917, 16.09.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brown, JL, Hennessy, M, Sales, JM, DiClemente, R, Salazar, LF, Vanable, PA, Carey, MP, Romer, D, Valois, RF, Brown, LK & Stanton, B 2011, 'Multiple method contraception use among African American adolescents in four US cities', Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol. 2011, 765917. https://doi.org/10.1155/2011/765917
Brown, Jennifer L. ; Hennessy, Michael ; Sales, Jessica M. ; DiClemente, Ralph ; Salazar, Laura F. ; Vanable, Peter A. ; Carey, Michael P. ; Romer, Daniel ; Valois, Robert F. ; Brown, Larry K. ; Stanton, Bonita. / Multiple method contraception use among African American adolescents in four US cities. In: Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2011 ; Vol. 2011.
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