Multiple Family Groups for Children with Disruptive Behavior Disorders: Child Outcomes at 6-Month Follow-Up

Geetha Gopalan, Anil Chacko, Lydia Franco, Kara M. Dean-Assael, Lauren E. Rotko, Sue M. Marcus, Kimberly E. Hoagwood, Mary M. McKay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This paper reports on the 6-month follow-up outcomes of an effectiveness study testing a multiple family group (MFG) intervention for clinic-referred youth (aged 7–11) with disruptive behavior disorders (DBDs) and their families in socioeconomically disadvantaged families compared to services-as-usual (SAU) using a block comparison design. The settings were urban community-based outpatient mental health agencies. Clinic-based providers and family partner advocates facilitated the MFG intervention. Parent-report measures targeting child behavior, social skills, and impairment across functional domains (i.e., relationships with peers, parents, siblings, and academic progress) were assessed across four timepoints (baseline, mid-test, post-test, and 6-month follow-up) using mixed effects regression modeling. Compared to SAU participants, MFG participants reported significant improvement at 6-month follow-up in child behavior, impact of behavior on relationship with peers, and overall impairment/need for services. Findings indicate that MFG may provide longer-term benefits for youth with DBDs and their families in community-based settings. Implications within the context of a transforming healthcare system are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2721-2733
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Child and Family Studies
Volume24
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 23 2014

Fingerprint

Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders
behavior disorder
Group
Child Behavior
parents
Vulnerable Populations
social behavior
community
Siblings
Mental Health
Outpatients
Parents
mental health
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Delivery of Health Care
regression

Keywords

  • Child disruptive behavior disorders
  • Effectiveness trials
  • Inner-city communities
  • Service delivery
  • Socioeconomically disadvantaged communities

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

Cite this

Multiple Family Groups for Children with Disruptive Behavior Disorders : Child Outcomes at 6-Month Follow-Up. / Gopalan, Geetha; Chacko, Anil; Franco, Lydia; Dean-Assael, Kara M.; Rotko, Lauren E.; Marcus, Sue M.; Hoagwood, Kimberly E.; McKay, Mary M.

In: Journal of Child and Family Studies, Vol. 24, No. 9, 23.11.2014, p. 2721-2733.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gopalan, G, Chacko, A, Franco, L, Dean-Assael, KM, Rotko, LE, Marcus, SM, Hoagwood, KE & McKay, MM 2014, 'Multiple Family Groups for Children with Disruptive Behavior Disorders: Child Outcomes at 6-Month Follow-Up', Journal of Child and Family Studies, vol. 24, no. 9, pp. 2721-2733. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10826-014-0074-6
Gopalan, Geetha ; Chacko, Anil ; Franco, Lydia ; Dean-Assael, Kara M. ; Rotko, Lauren E. ; Marcus, Sue M. ; Hoagwood, Kimberly E. ; McKay, Mary M. / Multiple Family Groups for Children with Disruptive Behavior Disorders : Child Outcomes at 6-Month Follow-Up. In: Journal of Child and Family Studies. 2014 ; Vol. 24, No. 9. pp. 2721-2733.
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