Multinuclear in situ magnetic resonance imaging of electrochemical double-layer capacitors

Andrew J. Ilott, Nicole M. Trease, Clare P. Grey, Alexej Jerschow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The last decade has seen an intensified interest in the development and use of electrochemical double-layer capacitors, fuelled by the availability of new electrode materials. The use of nanoporous carbons, in particular, with extremely high surface areas for ion adsorption has enabled the development of working devices with significantly increased capacitances that have become viable alternatives to lithium-ion batteries in certain applications. An understanding of the charge storage mechanism and the ion dynamics inside the nanopores is only just emerging, with the most compelling evidence coming from simulation. Here we present the first in situ magnetic resonance imaging experiments of electrochemical double-layer capacitors. These experiments overcome the limitations of other techniques and give spatially resolved chemical information about the electrolyte ions in real time for a working capacitor of standard geometry. The results provide insight into the predominant capacitive processes occurring at different states of charge and discharge.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number4536
JournalNature Communications
Volume5
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2014

Fingerprint

electrochemical capacitors
Magnetic resonance
magnetic resonance
Capacitors
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Ions
Imaging techniques
ions
Nanopores
Electrolytes
Capacitance
Carbon
electrode materials
Experiments
Lithium
Availability
Adsorption
availability
electric batteries
emerging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Chemistry(all)
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Multinuclear in situ magnetic resonance imaging of electrochemical double-layer capacitors. / Ilott, Andrew J.; Trease, Nicole M.; Grey, Clare P.; Jerschow, Alexej.

In: Nature Communications, Vol. 5, 4536, 01.08.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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