Multi-modal measurement of anxiety and social skills in a behavioral role-play test: Generalizability and discriminant validity

Peter M. Monti, Jan L. Wallander, David K. Ahern, David Abrams, Sandra M. Munroe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The Simulated Social Interaction Test (SSIT), a behavioral procedure for assessing anxiety and social skills, was evaluated using a generalizability approach with college students. In addition to self-report and behavioral ratings, heart rate responsivity during the SSIT was employed as an index of anxiety. For the most part, results of the generalizability analysis replicated previous findings with a psychiatric population, suggesting that the SSIT is a psychometrically sound procedure for obtaining judgments of anxiety and social skills. A moderate negative relationship was found between the ratings of anxiety and social skills, providing further support for the discriminative validity of these constructs. Finally, including a third measurement condition (physiological arousal) did not result in increased generalizability. Indeed, even when a subsample of "heart rate responders" was empirically identified, the unexplained residual variance was not decreased, suggesting a lack of convergence for different methods of measuring anxiety.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)15-25
Number of pages11
JournalBehavioral Assessment
Volume6
Issue number1
StatePublished - Dec 1984

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Anxiety
Interpersonal Relations
Heart Rate
Arousal
Self Report
Psychiatry
Social Skills
Students
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Multi-modal measurement of anxiety and social skills in a behavioral role-play test : Generalizability and discriminant validity. / Monti, Peter M.; Wallander, Jan L.; Ahern, David K.; Abrams, David; Munroe, Sandra M.

In: Behavioral Assessment, Vol. 6, No. 1, 12.1984, p. 15-25.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Monti, Peter M. ; Wallander, Jan L. ; Ahern, David K. ; Abrams, David ; Munroe, Sandra M. / Multi-modal measurement of anxiety and social skills in a behavioral role-play test : Generalizability and discriminant validity. In: Behavioral Assessment. 1984 ; Vol. 6, No. 1. pp. 15-25.
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