Moving Towards a More Comprehensive Investigation of Racial/Ethnic Differences in Cognitive Disability Among US Adults

Emma K T Benn, Ashley Fox, Kezhen Fei, Eric Roberts, Bernadette Boden-Albala

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We examined racial/ethnic differences in cognitive disability and the contribution of sociodemographic factors to these differences. Using logistic regression, we measured the association between race/ethnicity and cognitive disability after adjustment for sociodemographic covariates, including agegroup, sex, education, nativity, region, marital status, and occupation among 2009 American Community Survey respondents (≥25 years). Effect modification was also explored. Cognitive disability was self-reported by 6 % of respondents. The proportion with cognitive disability was highest for Blacks and Native American/Pacific Islanders. Statistically significant effect modification was observed for all sociodemographic covariates, except sex. Although most sociodemographic modifiers revealed a more convoluted relationship between race/ethnicity and cognitive disability, the cognitive benefits of higher education, foreign born nativity, and top-tier occupations were observed among most racial/ethnic groups. The observed interplay between sociodemographics and race/ethnicity highlight a complex relationship between race/ethnicity and cognitive disability. Future research should examine mechanisms for this induced complexity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1105-1113
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Immigrant and Minority Health
Volume17
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 10 2014

Fingerprint

Occupations
Sex Education
North American Indians
Marital Status
Ethnic Groups
Logistic Models
Education
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Cognition
  • Disparities
  • Epidemiology
  • Nativity
  • Race/ethnicity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Moving Towards a More Comprehensive Investigation of Racial/Ethnic Differences in Cognitive Disability Among US Adults. / Benn, Emma K T; Fox, Ashley; Fei, Kezhen; Roberts, Eric; Boden-Albala, Bernadette.

In: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health, Vol. 17, No. 4, 10.07.2014, p. 1105-1113.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{2a625c87716a4daa83bc18b79ca3d658,
title = "Moving Towards a More Comprehensive Investigation of Racial/Ethnic Differences in Cognitive Disability Among US Adults",
abstract = "We examined racial/ethnic differences in cognitive disability and the contribution of sociodemographic factors to these differences. Using logistic regression, we measured the association between race/ethnicity and cognitive disability after adjustment for sociodemographic covariates, including agegroup, sex, education, nativity, region, marital status, and occupation among 2009 American Community Survey respondents (≥25 years). Effect modification was also explored. Cognitive disability was self-reported by 6 {\%} of respondents. The proportion with cognitive disability was highest for Blacks and Native American/Pacific Islanders. Statistically significant effect modification was observed for all sociodemographic covariates, except sex. Although most sociodemographic modifiers revealed a more convoluted relationship between race/ethnicity and cognitive disability, the cognitive benefits of higher education, foreign born nativity, and top-tier occupations were observed among most racial/ethnic groups. The observed interplay between sociodemographics and race/ethnicity highlight a complex relationship between race/ethnicity and cognitive disability. Future research should examine mechanisms for this induced complexity.",
keywords = "Cognition, Disparities, Epidemiology, Nativity, Race/ethnicity",
author = "Benn, {Emma K T} and Ashley Fox and Kezhen Fei and Eric Roberts and Bernadette Boden-Albala",
year = "2014",
month = "7",
day = "10",
doi = "10.1007/s10903-014-0073-0",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "17",
pages = "1105--1113",
journal = "Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health",
issn = "1557-1912",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Moving Towards a More Comprehensive Investigation of Racial/Ethnic Differences in Cognitive Disability Among US Adults

AU - Benn, Emma K T

AU - Fox, Ashley

AU - Fei, Kezhen

AU - Roberts, Eric

AU - Boden-Albala, Bernadette

PY - 2014/7/10

Y1 - 2014/7/10

N2 - We examined racial/ethnic differences in cognitive disability and the contribution of sociodemographic factors to these differences. Using logistic regression, we measured the association between race/ethnicity and cognitive disability after adjustment for sociodemographic covariates, including agegroup, sex, education, nativity, region, marital status, and occupation among 2009 American Community Survey respondents (≥25 years). Effect modification was also explored. Cognitive disability was self-reported by 6 % of respondents. The proportion with cognitive disability was highest for Blacks and Native American/Pacific Islanders. Statistically significant effect modification was observed for all sociodemographic covariates, except sex. Although most sociodemographic modifiers revealed a more convoluted relationship between race/ethnicity and cognitive disability, the cognitive benefits of higher education, foreign born nativity, and top-tier occupations were observed among most racial/ethnic groups. The observed interplay between sociodemographics and race/ethnicity highlight a complex relationship between race/ethnicity and cognitive disability. Future research should examine mechanisms for this induced complexity.

AB - We examined racial/ethnic differences in cognitive disability and the contribution of sociodemographic factors to these differences. Using logistic regression, we measured the association between race/ethnicity and cognitive disability after adjustment for sociodemographic covariates, including agegroup, sex, education, nativity, region, marital status, and occupation among 2009 American Community Survey respondents (≥25 years). Effect modification was also explored. Cognitive disability was self-reported by 6 % of respondents. The proportion with cognitive disability was highest for Blacks and Native American/Pacific Islanders. Statistically significant effect modification was observed for all sociodemographic covariates, except sex. Although most sociodemographic modifiers revealed a more convoluted relationship between race/ethnicity and cognitive disability, the cognitive benefits of higher education, foreign born nativity, and top-tier occupations were observed among most racial/ethnic groups. The observed interplay between sociodemographics and race/ethnicity highlight a complex relationship between race/ethnicity and cognitive disability. Future research should examine mechanisms for this induced complexity.

KW - Cognition

KW - Disparities

KW - Epidemiology

KW - Nativity

KW - Race/ethnicity

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84937514418&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84937514418&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10903-014-0073-0

DO - 10.1007/s10903-014-0073-0

M3 - Article

VL - 17

SP - 1105

EP - 1113

JO - Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health

JF - Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health

SN - 1557-1912

IS - 4

ER -