Moving Beyond Age: An Exploratory Qualitative Study on the Context of Young African American Men and Women’s Sexual Debut

Yzette Lanier, Jennifer M. Stewart, Jean J. Schensul, Barbara J. Guthrie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

African American youth continue to be disproportionately affected by HIV. Early sexual debut has been identified as a major determinant of HIV risk. However, emerging research suggests that the overarching context in which first sex occurs may have greater implications for sexual health than simply age alone. The purpose of this exploratory, qualitative study was to better understand the broader context of African Americans’ sexual debut. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 African American men and women aged 18–24 years. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the data. The mean age at sexual debut for the sample was 15.4 (SD = 3.3), and youth framed their sexual debut as positive (50%), negative (30%), and both positive and negative (20%). The majority of youth initiated pre-sex conversations with their partners to gauge potential interest in engaging in sexual activity, and all youth utilized at least one HIV/sexually transmitted infection and pregnancy prevention method. However, most youth failed to talk to their partners prior to sex about their past sexual histories and what the experience meant for their relationship. Key differences emerged between youth who framed the experience as positive and those who framed the experience as negative or both positive and negative in terms of their motivations for initiating sex (i.e., readiness to initiate sex, pressure, and emotionally safety) and post-sex emotions (i.e., remorse and contentment). Findings provide further support for examining the broader sexual context of African American’s sexual debut. A more comprehensive understanding of sexual debut will aid in the development and tailoring of sexual risk reduction programs targeting African American youth.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of racial and ethnic health disparities
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Apr 25 2017

Fingerprint

African Americans
HIV
Sexual Development
experience
Reproductive Health
Risk Reduction Behavior
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
American
Sexual Behavior
Motivation
pregnancy
Emotions
conversation
emotion
Interviews
determinants
Safety
Pressure
Pregnancy
interview

Keywords

  • African American youth
  • Context
  • HIV
  • Sexual debut
  • USA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Anthropology
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Moving Beyond Age : An Exploratory Qualitative Study on the Context of Young African American Men and Women’s Sexual Debut. / Lanier, Yzette; Stewart, Jennifer M.; Schensul, Jean J.; Guthrie, Barbara J.

In: Journal of racial and ethnic health disparities, 25.04.2017, p. 1-10.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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