Motivated Recall in the Service of the Economic System

The Case of Anthropogenic Climate Change

Erin P. Hennes, Benjamin C. Ruisch, Irina Feygina, Christopher A. Monteiro, John Jost

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The contemporary political landscape is characterized by numerous divisive issues. Unlike many other issues, however, much of the disagreement about climate change centers not on how best to take action to address the problem, but on whether the problem exists at all. Psychological studies indicate that, to the extent that sustainability initiatives are seen as threatening to the socioeconomic system, individuals may downplay environmental problems in order to defend and protect the status quo. In the current research, participants were presented with scientific information about climate change and later asked to recall details of what they had learned. Individuals who were experimentally induced (Study 1) or dispositionally inclined (Studies 2 and 3) to justify the economic system misremembered the evidence to be less serious, and this was associated with increased skepticism. However, when high system justifiers were led to believe that the economy was in a recovery, they recalled climate change information to be more serious than did those assigned to a control condition. When low system justifiers were led to believe that the economy was in recession, they recalled the information to be less serious (Study 3). These findings suggest that because system justification can impact information processing, simply providing the public with scientific evidence may be insufficient to inspire action to mitigate climate change. However, linking environmental information to statements about the strength of the economic system may satiate system justification needs and break the psychological link between proenvironmental initiatives and economic risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)755-771
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Experimental Psychology: General
Volume145
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2016

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Climate Change
Economics
Psychology
Automatic Data Processing
Economic Systems
Research
Psychological
Justification
Economy

Keywords

  • Climate change
  • Framing
  • Motivated information processing
  • Recall
  • System justification

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Psychology(all)
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Motivated Recall in the Service of the Economic System : The Case of Anthropogenic Climate Change. / Hennes, Erin P.; Ruisch, Benjamin C.; Feygina, Irina; Monteiro, Christopher A.; Jost, John.

In: Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, Vol. 145, No. 6, 01.06.2016, p. 755-771.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hennes, Erin P. ; Ruisch, Benjamin C. ; Feygina, Irina ; Monteiro, Christopher A. ; Jost, John. / Motivated Recall in the Service of the Economic System : The Case of Anthropogenic Climate Change. In: Journal of Experimental Psychology: General. 2016 ; Vol. 145, No. 6. pp. 755-771.
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