Motion is inevitable: The impact of motion correction schemes on HARDI reconstructions

Shireen Elhabian, Yaniv Gur, Clement Vachet, Joseph Piven, Martin Styner, Ilana Leppert, G. Bruce Pike, Guido Gerig

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Abstract

    Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) is known to be prone to artifacts related to motion originating from subject movement, cardiac pulsation and breathing, but also to mechanical issues such as table vibrations. Given the necessity for rigorous quality control and motion correction, users are often left to use simple heuristics to select correction schemes, but do not fully understand the consequences of such choices on the final analysis, moreover being at risk to introduce confounding factors in population studies. This paper reports work in progress towards a comprehensive evaluation framework of HARDI motion correction to support selection of optimal methods to correct for even subtle motion. We make use of human brain HARDI data from a well controlled motion experiment to simulate various degrees of motion corruption. Choices for correction include exclusion or registration of motion corrupted directions, with different choices of interpolation. The comparative evaluation is based on studying effects of motion correction on three different metrics commonly used when using DWI data, including similarity of fiber orientation distribution functions (fODFs), global brain connectivity via Graph Diffusion Distance (GDD), and reproducibility of prominent and anatomically defined fiber tracts. Effects of various settings are systematically explored and illustrated, leading to the somewhat surprising conclusion that a best choice is the alignment and interpolation of all DWI directions, not only directions considered as corrupted.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Title of host publicationComputational Diffusion MRI - MICCAI Workshop 2014
    Publisherspringer berlin
    Pages169-179
    Number of pages11
    Volume39
    ISBN (Print)9783319111810
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 2014
    EventMICCAI Workshop on Computational Diffusion MRI, CDMRI 2014 held under the auspices of the 17th International Conference on Medical Image Computing and Computer Assisted Intervention, MICCAI 2014 - Boston, United States
    Duration: Sep 18 2014Sep 18 2014

    Publication series

    NameMathematics and Visualization
    Volume39
    ISSN (Print)16123786
    ISSN (Electronic)2197666X

    Other

    OtherMICCAI Workshop on Computational Diffusion MRI, CDMRI 2014 held under the auspices of the 17th International Conference on Medical Image Computing and Computer Assisted Intervention, MICCAI 2014
    CountryUnited States
    CityBoston
    Period9/18/149/18/14

    Fingerprint

    Motion
    Imaging techniques
    Brain
    Interpolation
    Imaging
    Fiber reinforced materials
    Distribution functions
    Quality control
    Interpolate
    Graph Connectivity
    Fiber Orientation
    Comprehensive Evaluation
    Fibers
    Confounding
    Reproducibility
    Quality Control
    Cardiac
    Registration
    Table
    Distribution Function

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design
    • Applied Mathematics
    • Geometry and Topology
    • Modeling and Simulation

    Cite this

    Elhabian, S., Gur, Y., Vachet, C., Piven, J., Styner, M., Leppert, I., ... Gerig, G. (2014). Motion is inevitable: The impact of motion correction schemes on HARDI reconstructions. In Computational Diffusion MRI - MICCAI Workshop 2014 (Vol. 39, pp. 169-179). (Mathematics and Visualization; Vol. 39). springer berlin. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-11182-7_15

    Motion is inevitable : The impact of motion correction schemes on HARDI reconstructions. / Elhabian, Shireen; Gur, Yaniv; Vachet, Clement; Piven, Joseph; Styner, Martin; Leppert, Ilana; Bruce Pike, G.; Gerig, Guido.

    Computational Diffusion MRI - MICCAI Workshop 2014. Vol. 39 springer berlin, 2014. p. 169-179 (Mathematics and Visualization; Vol. 39).

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Elhabian, S, Gur, Y, Vachet, C, Piven, J, Styner, M, Leppert, I, Bruce Pike, G & Gerig, G 2014, Motion is inevitable: The impact of motion correction schemes on HARDI reconstructions. in Computational Diffusion MRI - MICCAI Workshop 2014. vol. 39, Mathematics and Visualization, vol. 39, springer berlin, pp. 169-179, MICCAI Workshop on Computational Diffusion MRI, CDMRI 2014 held under the auspices of the 17th International Conference on Medical Image Computing and Computer Assisted Intervention, MICCAI 2014, Boston, United States, 9/18/14. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-11182-7_15
    Elhabian S, Gur Y, Vachet C, Piven J, Styner M, Leppert I et al. Motion is inevitable: The impact of motion correction schemes on HARDI reconstructions. In Computational Diffusion MRI - MICCAI Workshop 2014. Vol. 39. springer berlin. 2014. p. 169-179. (Mathematics and Visualization). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-11182-7_15
    Elhabian, Shireen ; Gur, Yaniv ; Vachet, Clement ; Piven, Joseph ; Styner, Martin ; Leppert, Ilana ; Bruce Pike, G. ; Gerig, Guido. / Motion is inevitable : The impact of motion correction schemes on HARDI reconstructions. Computational Diffusion MRI - MICCAI Workshop 2014. Vol. 39 springer berlin, 2014. pp. 169-179 (Mathematics and Visualization).
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