Mothers and sons: Preference formation and female labor force dynamics

Raquel Fernandez, Alessandra Fogli, Claudia Olivetti

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

    Abstract

    This paper argues that the growing presence of a new type of man - one brought up in a family in which the mother worked - has been a significant factor in the increase in female labor force participation over time. We present cross-sectional evidence showing that the wives of men whose mothers worked are themselves significantly more likely to work. We use variation in the importance of World War II as a shock to women's labor force participation - as proxied by variation in the male draft rate across U. S. states - to provide evidence in support of the intergenerational consequences of our propagation mechanism.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)1249-1299
    Number of pages51
    JournalQuarterly Journal of Economics
    Volume119
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Nov 2004

    Fingerprint

    Son preference
    Preference formation
    Labor force
    Propagation mechanism
    Second World War
    Female labor force participation
    Draft
    Women's labor force participation
    Factors

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Economics and Econometrics

    Cite this

    Mothers and sons : Preference formation and female labor force dynamics. / Fernandez, Raquel; Fogli, Alessandra; Olivetti, Claudia.

    In: Quarterly Journal of Economics, Vol. 119, No. 4, 11.2004, p. 1249-1299.

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

    Fernandez, Raquel ; Fogli, Alessandra ; Olivetti, Claudia. / Mothers and sons : Preference formation and female labor force dynamics. In: Quarterly Journal of Economics. 2004 ; Vol. 119, No. 4. pp. 1249-1299.
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