Mothering under pressure

Environmental, child, and dyadic correlates of maternal self-efficacy among low-income women

C. Cybele Raver, Bonnie J. Leadbeater

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In this study, the authors examine environmental, child, and dyadic correlates of mothers' perceptions of parenting self-efficacy among a group of women raising toddlers in an urban area of concentrated poverty (N = 44). Findings suggest that women's self-efficacy is inversely related to the number of environmental risks and to child's temperamental difficulty. Although observed measures of dyadic conflict were not directly related to women's ratings of self-efficacy, hierarchical regression analysis indicated that mother-toddler conflict served as a moderator. Specifically, higher maternal self-efficacy was associated with fewer risks for women experiencing higher levels of conflict. For mothers experiencing lower levels of conflict with their children, maternal self-efficacy was inversely associated with child's temperamental difficulty.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)523-534
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Family Psychology
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1999

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Self Efficacy
Mothers
Pressure
Poverty Areas
Parenting
Regression Analysis
Conflict (Psychology)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Mothering under pressure : Environmental, child, and dyadic correlates of maternal self-efficacy among low-income women. / Raver, C. Cybele; Leadbeater, Bonnie J.

In: Journal of Family Psychology, Vol. 13, No. 4, 12.1999, p. 523-534.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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