Mortgage delinquency and changes in access to health resources and depressive symptoms in a nationally representative cohort of Americans older than 50 years

Dawn E. Alley, Jennifer Lloyd, Jose Pagan, Craig E. Pollack, Michelle Shardell, Carolyn Cannuscio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: We evaluated associations between mortgage delinquency and changes in health and health-relevant resources over 2 years, with data from the Health and Retirement Study, a longitudinal survey representative of US adults older than 50 years. Methods: In 2008, participants reported whether they had fallen behind on mortgage payments since 2006 (n=2474). We used logistic regression to compare changes in health (incidence of elevated depressive symptoms, major declines in self-rated health) and access to health-relevant resources (food, prescription medications) between participants who fell behind on their mortgage payments and those who did not. Results: Compared with nondelinquent participants, the mortgage-delinquent group had worse health status and less access to health-relevant resources at baseline. They were also significantly more likely to develop incident depressive symptoms (odds ratio [OR]=8.60; 95% confidence interval [CI]=3.38, 21.85), food insecurity (OR=7.53; 95% CI=3.01, 18.84), and cost-related medication nonadherence (OR=8.66; 95% CI=3.72, 20.16) during follow-up. Conclusions: Mortgage delinquency was associated with significant elevations in the incidence of mental health impairments and health-relevant material disadvantage. Widespread mortgage default may have important public health implications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2293-2298
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume101
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2011

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Health Resources
Depression
Health
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Medication Adherence
Food Supply
Retirement
Incidence
Health Status
Prescriptions
Longitudinal Studies
Mental Health
Public Health
Logistic Models
Costs and Cost Analysis
Food

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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Mortgage delinquency and changes in access to health resources and depressive symptoms in a nationally representative cohort of Americans older than 50 years. / Alley, Dawn E.; Lloyd, Jennifer; Pagan, Jose; Pollack, Craig E.; Shardell, Michelle; Cannuscio, Carolyn.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 101, No. 12, 01.12.2011, p. 2293-2298.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Alley, Dawn E. ; Lloyd, Jennifer ; Pagan, Jose ; Pollack, Craig E. ; Shardell, Michelle ; Cannuscio, Carolyn. / Mortgage delinquency and changes in access to health resources and depressive symptoms in a nationally representative cohort of Americans older than 50 years. In: American Journal of Public Health. 2011 ; Vol. 101, No. 12. pp. 2293-2298.
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