Monolithic CAD/CAM lithium disilicate versus veneered Y-TZP crowns: comparison of failure modes and reliability after fatigue.

Petra C. Guess, Ricardo A. Zavanelli, Nelson R F A Silva, Estevam A. Bonfante, Paulo G. Coelho, Van P. Thompson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The aim of this research was to evaluate the fatigue behavior and reliability of monolithic computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacture (CAD/CAM) lithium disilicate and hand-layer-veneered zirconia all-ceramic crowns. A CAD-based mandibular molar crown preparation, fabricated using rapid prototyping, served as the master die. Fully anatomically shaped monolithic lithium disilicate crowns (IPS e.max CAD, n = 19) and hand-layer-veneered zirconia-based crowns (IPS e.max ZirCAD/Ceram, n = 21) were designed and milled using a CAD/CAM system. Crowns were cemented on aged dentinlike composite dies with resin cement. Crowns were exposed to mouth-motion fatigue by sliding a WC-indenter (r = 3.18 mm) 0.7 mm lingually down the distobuccal cusp using three different step-stress profiles until failure occurred. Failure was designated as a large chip or fracture through the crown. If no failures occurred at high loads (> 900 N), the test method was changed to staircase r ratio fatigue. Stress level probability curves and reliability were calculated. Hand-layer-veneered zirconia crowns revealed veneer chipping and had a reliability of < 0.01 (0.03 to 0.00, two-sided 90% confidence bounds) for a mission of 100,000 cycles and a 200-N load. None of the fully anatomically shaped CAD/CAM-fabricated monolithic lithium disilicate crowns failed during step-stress mouth-motion fatigue (180,000 cycles, 900 N). CAD/CAM lithium disilicate crowns also survived r ratio fatigue (1,000,000 cycles, 100 to 1,000 N). There appears to be a threshold for damage/bulk fracture for the lithium disilicate ceramic in the range of 1,100 to 1,200 N. Based on present fatigue findings, the application of CAD/CAM lithium disilicate ceramic in a monolithic/fully anatomical configuration resulted in fatigue-resistant crowns, whereas hand-layer-veneered zirconia crowns revealed a high susceptibility to mouth-motion cyclic loading with early veneer failures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)434-442
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Prosthodontics
Volume23
Issue number5
StatePublished - Sep 2010

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Computer-Aided Design
Crowns
Fatigue
Ceramics
Hand
Mouth
lithia disilicate
Resin Cements

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oral Surgery

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Monolithic CAD/CAM lithium disilicate versus veneered Y-TZP crowns : comparison of failure modes and reliability after fatigue. / Guess, Petra C.; Zavanelli, Ricardo A.; Silva, Nelson R F A; Bonfante, Estevam A.; Coelho, Paulo G.; Thompson, Van P.

In: International Journal of Prosthodontics, Vol. 23, No. 5, 09.2010, p. 434-442.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Guess, Petra C. ; Zavanelli, Ricardo A. ; Silva, Nelson R F A ; Bonfante, Estevam A. ; Coelho, Paulo G. ; Thompson, Van P. / Monolithic CAD/CAM lithium disilicate versus veneered Y-TZP crowns : comparison of failure modes and reliability after fatigue. In: International Journal of Prosthodontics. 2010 ; Vol. 23, No. 5. pp. 434-442.
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