Monitoring Molecular Transport across Colloidal Membranes

Emilia V. Silletta, Zhe Xu, Mena Youssef, Stefano Sacanna, Alexej Jerschow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The controlled shaping and surface functionalization of colloidal particles has provided opportunities for the development of new materials and responsive particles. The possibility of creating hollow particles with semipermeable walls allows modulating molecular transport properties on colloidal length scales. While shapes and sizes can typically be observed by optical means, the underlying chemical and physical properties are often invisible. Here, we present measurements of cross-membrane transport via pulsed field gradient NMR in packings of hollow colloidal particles. The work is conducted using a systematic selection of particle sizes, wall permeabilities, and osmotic pressures and allows tracking organic molecules as well as ions. It is also shown that, while direct transport of molecules can be measured, indirect markers can be obtained for invisible species via the osmotic pressure as well. The cross-membrane transport information is important for applications in nanoconfinement, nanofiltration, nanodelivery, or nanoreactor devices.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4931-4936
Number of pages6
JournalUnknown Journal
Volume122
Issue number18
DOIs
StatePublished - May 10 2018

Fingerprint

Membrane
Nanoreactors
Monitoring
membranes
Membranes
Nanofiltration
Molecules
Transport properties
osmosis
Chemical properties
Physical properties
Particle size
Nuclear magnetic resonance
Ions
hollow
Functionalization
Transport Properties
Physical property
Particle Size
Length Scale

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films
  • Materials Chemistry

Cite this

Monitoring Molecular Transport across Colloidal Membranes. / Silletta, Emilia V.; Xu, Zhe; Youssef, Mena; Sacanna, Stefano; Jerschow, Alexej.

In: Unknown Journal, Vol. 122, No. 18, 10.05.2018, p. 4931-4936.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Silletta, Emilia V. ; Xu, Zhe ; Youssef, Mena ; Sacanna, Stefano ; Jerschow, Alexej. / Monitoring Molecular Transport across Colloidal Membranes. In: Unknown Journal. 2018 ; Vol. 122, No. 18. pp. 4931-4936.
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