Molecular recognition in the solid state: Hydrogen-bonding control of molecular aggregation

Erkang Fan, Cristina Vicent, Steven J. Geib, Andrew Hamilton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The design of molecular subunits that self-assemble into well-defined structures in the solid state is an area of intense current interest. A key to controlling the packing arrangement lies in manipulating the type and orientation of the non-covalent interactions between the subunits. The strong and directional nature of hydrogen bonds has led to their widespread use in self-assembling systems. In the solid state, rules have been delineated to allow the reasonable prediction of hydrogen-bonding packing patterns in crystals. This had led to a search for molecular components that because of their hydrogen-bonding characteristics will form persistent packing motifs in well-defined shapes or patterns. We have recently discovered that a strong bidentate hydrogen bonding interaction is formed between 2-amino-6-methylpyridine and carboxylic acids. Bis(2-amino-6-methylpyridine) derivatives and dicarboxylic acids will self-assemble into alternating cocrystal structures. The packing of the two components can be controlled in a rational way by changing the nature, size, and orientation of the spacer groups that link the hydrogen-bonding subunits.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1113-1117
Number of pages5
JournalChemistry of Materials
Volume6
Issue number8
StatePublished - 1994

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Molecular recognition
Hydrogen bonds
Agglomeration
Dicarboxylic Acids
Carboxylic Acids
Carboxylic acids
Derivatives
Crystals
Acids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Chemistry
  • Materials Science(all)

Cite this

Molecular recognition in the solid state : Hydrogen-bonding control of molecular aggregation. / Fan, Erkang; Vicent, Cristina; Geib, Steven J.; Hamilton, Andrew.

In: Chemistry of Materials, Vol. 6, No. 8, 1994, p. 1113-1117.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fan, Erkang ; Vicent, Cristina ; Geib, Steven J. ; Hamilton, Andrew. / Molecular recognition in the solid state : Hydrogen-bonding control of molecular aggregation. In: Chemistry of Materials. 1994 ; Vol. 6, No. 8. pp. 1113-1117.
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