Modeling actuation of ionomer cilia in salt solution under an external electric field

Alain Boldini, Maxwell Rosen, Youngsu Cha, Maurizio Porfiri

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

A recent experiment by Kim's group from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas has demonstrated the possibility of actuating ionomer cilia in salt solution. When these actuators are placed between two external electrodes, across which a small voltage is applied, they move toward the cathode. This is in stark contrast with the case of ionic polymer metal composites, where these ionomers are plated by metal electrodes and bending occurs towards the anode. Here, we seek to unravel the factors underlying the motion of ionomer cilia in salt solution through a physically-based model of actuation. In our model, electrochemistry is described through the Poisson-Nernst-Planck system in terms of concentrations of cations and anions and voltage, which is solved through the finite element method. Based on computer simulations, we establish that Maxwell stress is the main driving force for the motion of the cilia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationRapid Fire Interactive Presentations
Subtitle of host publicationAdvances in Control Systems; Advances in Robotics and Mechatronics; Automotive and Transportation Systems; Motion Planning and Trajectory Tracking; Soft Mechatronic Actuators and Sensors; Unmanned Ground and Aerial Vehicles
PublisherAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)
ISBN (Electronic)9780791859162
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019
EventASME 2019 Dynamic Systems and Control Conference, DSCC 2019 - Park City, United States
Duration: Oct 8 2019Oct 11 2019

Publication series

NameASME 2019 Dynamic Systems and Control Conference, DSCC 2019
Volume3

Conference

ConferenceASME 2019 Dynamic Systems and Control Conference, DSCC 2019
CountryUnited States
CityPark City
Period10/8/1910/11/19

Fingerprint

Ionomers
Electric fields
Salts
Electrodes
Electric potential
Electrochemistry
Metals
Anodes
Cathodes
Negative ions
Actuators
Positive ions
Finite element method
Computer simulation
Composite materials
Polymers
Experiments

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

Cite this

Boldini, A., Rosen, M., Cha, Y., & Porfiri, M. (2019). Modeling actuation of ionomer cilia in salt solution under an external electric field. In Rapid Fire Interactive Presentations: Advances in Control Systems; Advances in Robotics and Mechatronics; Automotive and Transportation Systems; Motion Planning and Trajectory Tracking; Soft Mechatronic Actuators and Sensors; Unmanned Ground and Aerial Vehicles (ASME 2019 Dynamic Systems and Control Conference, DSCC 2019; Vol. 3). American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). https://doi.org/10.1115/DSCC2019-9060

Modeling actuation of ionomer cilia in salt solution under an external electric field. / Boldini, Alain; Rosen, Maxwell; Cha, Youngsu; Porfiri, Maurizio.

Rapid Fire Interactive Presentations: Advances in Control Systems; Advances in Robotics and Mechatronics; Automotive and Transportation Systems; Motion Planning and Trajectory Tracking; Soft Mechatronic Actuators and Sensors; Unmanned Ground and Aerial Vehicles. American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), 2019. (ASME 2019 Dynamic Systems and Control Conference, DSCC 2019; Vol. 3).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Boldini, A, Rosen, M, Cha, Y & Porfiri, M 2019, Modeling actuation of ionomer cilia in salt solution under an external electric field. in Rapid Fire Interactive Presentations: Advances in Control Systems; Advances in Robotics and Mechatronics; Automotive and Transportation Systems; Motion Planning and Trajectory Tracking; Soft Mechatronic Actuators and Sensors; Unmanned Ground and Aerial Vehicles. ASME 2019 Dynamic Systems and Control Conference, DSCC 2019, vol. 3, American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), ASME 2019 Dynamic Systems and Control Conference, DSCC 2019, Park City, United States, 10/8/19. https://doi.org/10.1115/DSCC2019-9060
Boldini A, Rosen M, Cha Y, Porfiri M. Modeling actuation of ionomer cilia in salt solution under an external electric field. In Rapid Fire Interactive Presentations: Advances in Control Systems; Advances in Robotics and Mechatronics; Automotive and Transportation Systems; Motion Planning and Trajectory Tracking; Soft Mechatronic Actuators and Sensors; Unmanned Ground and Aerial Vehicles. American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). 2019. (ASME 2019 Dynamic Systems and Control Conference, DSCC 2019). https://doi.org/10.1115/DSCC2019-9060
Boldini, Alain ; Rosen, Maxwell ; Cha, Youngsu ; Porfiri, Maurizio. / Modeling actuation of ionomer cilia in salt solution under an external electric field. Rapid Fire Interactive Presentations: Advances in Control Systems; Advances in Robotics and Mechatronics; Automotive and Transportation Systems; Motion Planning and Trajectory Tracking; Soft Mechatronic Actuators and Sensors; Unmanned Ground and Aerial Vehicles. American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), 2019. (ASME 2019 Dynamic Systems and Control Conference, DSCC 2019).
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