Mixed-Status Immigrant Families in the United States: The Role of Social Justice in Intervention Research

Mackenzie D M Whipps, Hirokazu Yoshikawa

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

More than 4 million unauthorized parents of legal status children currently reside in the United States (Capps, Fix, & Zong, 2016). Developmental scientists and intervention researchers hoping to work with these mixed-status families face a myriad of challenges, largely generated from the population's policy-driven social exclusion. Despite the challenges, there is a moral imperative to work with and support parents and children currently living in mixed-status households. This chapter applies a social justice perspective, largely stemming from Prilleltensky's critical community psychological framework, to improve the relevance and usefulness of research on mixed-status families (Prilleltensky & Nelson, 1997). We discuss the utility of this social justice perspective in theory building, study design and implementation, and dissemination of findings regarding mixed-status families, with exemplars from recent research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationEquity and Justice in Developmental Science: Implications for Young People, Families, and Communities, 2016
PublisherAcademic Press Inc.
Pages231-255
Number of pages25
Volume51
ISBN (Print)9780128018965
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016

Publication series

NameAdvances in Child Development and Behavior
Volume51
ISSN (Print)00652407

Fingerprint

Social Justice
Parents
Research
Jurisprudence
Public Policy
Research Personnel
Psychology

Keywords

  • Immigration
  • Intervention
  • Policy
  • Social justice
  • Unauthorized

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Whipps, M. D. M., & Yoshikawa, H. (2016). Mixed-Status Immigrant Families in the United States: The Role of Social Justice in Intervention Research. In Equity and Justice in Developmental Science: Implications for Young People, Families, and Communities, 2016 (Vol. 51, pp. 231-255). (Advances in Child Development and Behavior; Vol. 51). Academic Press Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1016/bs.acdb.2016.04.003

Mixed-Status Immigrant Families in the United States : The Role of Social Justice in Intervention Research. / Whipps, Mackenzie D M; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu.

Equity and Justice in Developmental Science: Implications for Young People, Families, and Communities, 2016. Vol. 51 Academic Press Inc., 2016. p. 231-255 (Advances in Child Development and Behavior; Vol. 51).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Whipps, MDM & Yoshikawa, H 2016, Mixed-Status Immigrant Families in the United States: The Role of Social Justice in Intervention Research. in Equity and Justice in Developmental Science: Implications for Young People, Families, and Communities, 2016. vol. 51, Advances in Child Development and Behavior, vol. 51, Academic Press Inc., pp. 231-255. https://doi.org/10.1016/bs.acdb.2016.04.003
Whipps MDM, Yoshikawa H. Mixed-Status Immigrant Families in the United States: The Role of Social Justice in Intervention Research. In Equity and Justice in Developmental Science: Implications for Young People, Families, and Communities, 2016. Vol. 51. Academic Press Inc. 2016. p. 231-255. (Advances in Child Development and Behavior). https://doi.org/10.1016/bs.acdb.2016.04.003
Whipps, Mackenzie D M ; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu. / Mixed-Status Immigrant Families in the United States : The Role of Social Justice in Intervention Research. Equity and Justice in Developmental Science: Implications for Young People, Families, and Communities, 2016. Vol. 51 Academic Press Inc., 2016. pp. 231-255 (Advances in Child Development and Behavior).
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