Mindsets and pre-conscious open-mindedness to incidental information

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Mindset theory (Gollwitzer, 1990) proposes that deliberative mindsets are marked by more open-minded processing of information, whereas implemental mindsets are characterized by more closed-minded processing. Accordingly, deliberative and implemental mindsets should differ in selective processing of incidental information when performing a central task. In three experiments, participants in deliberative and implemental mindsets performed a computer task while randomly presented incidental, unavoidable words. A subsequent recognition memory test assessed selective processing of these incidental words. Results revealed that deliberative mindsets led to superior recognition memory, suggesting increased open-mindedness to processing incidental information. Implications for mindset and goal theories are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)48-61
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Experimental Social Psychology
Volume43
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2007

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Automatic Data Processing
information processing
Word Processing
experiment
Recognition (Psychology)

Keywords

  • Action phases
  • Mindsets
  • Selective information processing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

Cite this

Mindsets and pre-conscious open-mindedness to incidental information. / Fujita, Kentaro; Gollwitzer, Peter M.; Oettingen, Gabriele.

In: Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, Vol. 43, No. 1, 01.2007, p. 48-61.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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