Migration and HIV Risk Behaviors

Puerto Rican Drug Injectors in New York City and Puerto Rico

Sherry Deren, Sung Yeon Kang, Hector M. Colón, Jonny F. Andia, Rafaela R. Robles, Denise Oliver-Velez, Ann Finlinson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives. We compared injection-related HIV risk behaviors of Puerto Rican current injection drug users (IDUs) living in New York City and in Puerto Rico who also had injected in the other location with those who had not. Methods. We recruited Puerto Rican IDUs in New York City (n=561) and in Puerto Rico (n=312). Of the former, 39% were "newcomers," having previously injected in Puerto Rico; of the latter, 14% were "returnees," having previously injected in New York. We compared risk behaviors within each sample between those with and without experience injecting in the other location. Results. Newcomers reported higher levels of risk behaviors than other New York IDUs. Newcomer status (adjusted odds ratio [OR]=1.62) and homelessness (adjusted OR=2.52) were significant predictors of "shooting gallery" use; newcomer status also predicted paraphernalia sharing (adjusted OR=1.67). Returnee status was not related to these variables. Conclusions. Intervention services are needed that target mobile populations who are coming from an environment of high-risk behavior to one of low-risk behavior.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)812-816
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume93
Issue number5
StatePublished - May 2003

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Puerto Rico
Risk-Taking
HIV
Drug Users
Injections
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Odds Ratio
Homeless Persons
Health Services Needs and Demand

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Deren, S., Kang, S. Y., Colón, H. M., Andia, J. F., Robles, R. R., Oliver-Velez, D., & Finlinson, A. (2003). Migration and HIV Risk Behaviors: Puerto Rican Drug Injectors in New York City and Puerto Rico. American Journal of Public Health, 93(5), 812-816.

Migration and HIV Risk Behaviors : Puerto Rican Drug Injectors in New York City and Puerto Rico. / Deren, Sherry; Kang, Sung Yeon; Colón, Hector M.; Andia, Jonny F.; Robles, Rafaela R.; Oliver-Velez, Denise; Finlinson, Ann.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 93, No. 5, 05.2003, p. 812-816.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Deren, S, Kang, SY, Colón, HM, Andia, JF, Robles, RR, Oliver-Velez, D & Finlinson, A 2003, 'Migration and HIV Risk Behaviors: Puerto Rican Drug Injectors in New York City and Puerto Rico', American Journal of Public Health, vol. 93, no. 5, pp. 812-816.
Deren S, Kang SY, Colón HM, Andia JF, Robles RR, Oliver-Velez D et al. Migration and HIV Risk Behaviors: Puerto Rican Drug Injectors in New York City and Puerto Rico. American Journal of Public Health. 2003 May;93(5):812-816.
Deren, Sherry ; Kang, Sung Yeon ; Colón, Hector M. ; Andia, Jonny F. ; Robles, Rafaela R. ; Oliver-Velez, Denise ; Finlinson, Ann. / Migration and HIV Risk Behaviors : Puerto Rican Drug Injectors in New York City and Puerto Rico. In: American Journal of Public Health. 2003 ; Vol. 93, No. 5. pp. 812-816.
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