Micron-scale coherence in interphase chromatin dynamics

Alexandra Zidovska, David A. Weitz, Timothy J. Mitchison

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Chromatin structure and dynamics control all aspects of DNA biology yet are poorly understood, especially at large length scales. We developed an approach, displacement correlation spectroscopy based on time-resolved image correlation analysis, to map chromatin dynamics simultaneously across the whole nucleus in cultured human cells. This method revealed that chromatin movement was coherent across large regions (4-5 μm) for several seconds. Regions of coherent motion extended beyond the boundaries of single-chromosome territories, suggesting elastic coupling of motion over length scales much larger than those of genes. These large-scale, coupled motions were ATP dependent and unidirectional for several seconds, perhaps accounting for ATP-dependent directed movement of single genes. Perturbation of major nuclear ATPases such as DNA polymerase, RNA polymerase II, and topoisomerase II eliminated micron-scale coherence, while causing rapid, local movement to increase; i.e., local motions accelerated but became uncoupled from their neighbors.We observe similar trends in chromatin dynamics upon inducing a direct DNA damage; thus we hypothesize that this may be due to DNA damage responses that physically relax chromatin and block long-distance communication of forces.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)15555-15560
    Number of pages6
    JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
    Volume110
    Issue number39
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Sep 24 2013

    Fingerprint

    Interphase
    Chromatin
    DNA Damage
    Adenosine Triphosphate
    Type II DNA Topoisomerase
    RNA Polymerase II
    DNA-Directed DNA Polymerase
    Genes
    Adenosine Triphosphatases
    Cultured Cells
    Spectrum Analysis
    Chromosomes
    Communication
    DNA

    Keywords

    • Active materials
    • Self-organization
    • Soft matter

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • General

    Cite this

    Micron-scale coherence in interphase chromatin dynamics. / Zidovska, Alexandra; Weitz, David A.; Mitchison, Timothy J.

    In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 110, No. 39, 24.09.2013, p. 15555-15560.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Zidovska, Alexandra ; Weitz, David A. ; Mitchison, Timothy J. / Micron-scale coherence in interphase chromatin dynamics. In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 2013 ; Vol. 110, No. 39. pp. 15555-15560.
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