Micro-morphological changes prior to adhesive bonding: High-Alumina and glassy-matrix ceramics

Marco Cícero Bottino, Mutlu Özcan, Paulo Coelho, Luiz Felipe Valandro, José Carlos Bressiani, Ana Helena Almeida Bressiani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The aim of this study was to qualitatively demonstrate surface micro-morphological changes after the employment of different surface conditioning methods on high-alumina and glassy-matrix dental ceramics. Three disc-shaped high-alumina specimens (In-Ceram Alumina, INC) and 4 glassy-matrix ceramic specimens (Vitadur Alpha, V) (diameter: 5 mm and height: 5 mm) were manufactured. INC specimens were submitted to 3 different surface conditioning methods: INC 1 - Polishing with silicon carbide papers (SiC); INC 2- Chairside air-borne particle abrasion (50 μm Al 2O 3); INC 3 - Chairside silica coating (CoJet; 30 μm SiO x). Vitadur Alpha (V) specimens were subjected to 4 different surface conditioning methods: V 1 - Polishing with SiC papers; V 2 - HF acid etching; V 3 - Chairside air-borne particle abrasion (50 μm Al 2O 3); V 4 - Chairside silica coating (30 μm SiO x). Following completion of the surface conditioning methods, the specimens were analyzed using SEM. After polishing with SiC, the surfaces of V specimens remained relatively smooth while those of INC exhibited topographic irregularities. Chairside air-abrasion with either aluminum oxide or silica particles produced retentive patterns on both INC and V specimens, with smoother patterns observed after silica coating. V specimens etched with HF presented a highly porous surface. Chairside tribochemical silica coating resulted in smoother surfaces with particles embedded on the surface even after air-blasting. Surface conditioning using air-borne particle abrasion with either 50 μm alumina or 30 μm silica particles exhibited qualitatively comparable rough surfaces for both INC and V. HF acid gel created the most micro-retentive surface for the glassy-matrix ceramic tested.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)158-163
Number of pages6
JournalBrazilian Oral Research
Volume22
Issue number2
StatePublished - 2008

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Aluminum Oxide
Ceramics
Silicon Dioxide
Adhesives
Air
Air Conditioning
Acids
Tooth
Gels
silicon carbide

Keywords

  • Acid etching dental
  • Air abrasion dental
  • Ceramics
  • Hydrofluoric acid

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Bottino, M. C., Özcan, M., Coelho, P., Valandro, L. F., Bressiani, J. C., & Bressiani, A. H. A. (2008). Micro-morphological changes prior to adhesive bonding: High-Alumina and glassy-matrix ceramics. Brazilian Oral Research, 22(2), 158-163.

Micro-morphological changes prior to adhesive bonding : High-Alumina and glassy-matrix ceramics. / Bottino, Marco Cícero; Özcan, Mutlu; Coelho, Paulo; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Bressiani, José Carlos; Bressiani, Ana Helena Almeida.

In: Brazilian Oral Research, Vol. 22, No. 2, 2008, p. 158-163.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bottino, MC, Özcan, M, Coelho, P, Valandro, LF, Bressiani, JC & Bressiani, AHA 2008, 'Micro-morphological changes prior to adhesive bonding: High-Alumina and glassy-matrix ceramics', Brazilian Oral Research, vol. 22, no. 2, pp. 158-163.
Bottino MC, Özcan M, Coelho P, Valandro LF, Bressiani JC, Bressiani AHA. Micro-morphological changes prior to adhesive bonding: High-Alumina and glassy-matrix ceramics. Brazilian Oral Research. 2008;22(2):158-163.
Bottino, Marco Cícero ; Özcan, Mutlu ; Coelho, Paulo ; Valandro, Luiz Felipe ; Bressiani, José Carlos ; Bressiani, Ana Helena Almeida. / Micro-morphological changes prior to adhesive bonding : High-Alumina and glassy-matrix ceramics. In: Brazilian Oral Research. 2008 ; Vol. 22, No. 2. pp. 158-163.
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