Metabolite and light regulation of metabolism in plants: Lessons from the study of a single biochemical pathway

I. C. Oliveira, E. Brenner, J. Chiu, M. H. Hsieh, A. Kouranov, H. M. Lam, M. J. Shin, G. Coruzzi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We are using molecular, biochemical, and genetic approaches to study the structural and regulatory genes controlling the assimilation of inorganic nitrogen into the amino acids glutamine, glutamate, aspartate and asparagine. These amino acids serve as the principal nitrogen-transport amino acids in most crop and higher plants including Arabidopsis thaliana. We have begun to investigate the regulatory mechanisms controlling nitrogen assimilation into these amino acids in plants using molecular and genetic approaches in Arabidopsis. The synthesis of the amide amino acids glutamine and asparagine is subject to tight regulation in response to environmental factors such as light and to metabolic factors such as sucrose and amino acids. For instance, light induces the expression of glutamine synthetase (GLN2) and represses expression of asparagine synthetase (ASN1) genes. This reciprocal regulation of GLN2 and ASN1 genes by light is reflected at the level of transcription and at the level of glutamine and asparagine biosynthesis. Moreover, we have shown that the regulation of these genes is also reciprocally controlled by both organic nitrogen and carbon metabolites. We have recently used a reverse genetic approach to study putative components of such metabolic sensing mechanisms in plants that may be conserved in evolution. These components include an Arabidopsis homolog for a glutamate receptor gene originally found in animal systems and a plant PII gene, which is a homolog of a component of the bacterial Ntr system. Based on our observations on the biology of both structural and regulatory genes of the nitrogen assimilatory pathway, we have developed a model for metabolic control of the genes involved in the nitrogen assimilatory pathway in plants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)567-575
Number of pages9
JournalBrazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research
Volume34
Issue number5
StatePublished - May 2001

Fingerprint

Metabolites
Metabolism
biochemical pathways
Nitrogen
Genes
metabolites
Light
Amino Acids
amino acids
metabolism
Asparagine
asparagine
nitrogen
Glutamine
Arabidopsis
glutamine
Molecular Biology
genes
structural genes
Regulator Genes

Keywords

  • Amino acids
  • Ammonium
  • Arabidopsis thaliana
  • Carbon
  • Gene expression
  • Nitrogen assimilation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Metabolite and light regulation of metabolism in plants : Lessons from the study of a single biochemical pathway. / Oliveira, I. C.; Brenner, E.; Chiu, J.; Hsieh, M. H.; Kouranov, A.; Lam, H. M.; Shin, M. J.; Coruzzi, G.

In: Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research, Vol. 34, No. 5, 05.2001, p. 567-575.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Oliveira, I. C. ; Brenner, E. ; Chiu, J. ; Hsieh, M. H. ; Kouranov, A. ; Lam, H. M. ; Shin, M. J. ; Coruzzi, G. / Metabolite and light regulation of metabolism in plants : Lessons from the study of a single biochemical pathway. In: Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research. 2001 ; Vol. 34, No. 5. pp. 567-575.
@article{b8ff3512be544e8da3a656fa5389a300,
title = "Metabolite and light regulation of metabolism in plants: Lessons from the study of a single biochemical pathway",
abstract = "We are using molecular, biochemical, and genetic approaches to study the structural and regulatory genes controlling the assimilation of inorganic nitrogen into the amino acids glutamine, glutamate, aspartate and asparagine. These amino acids serve as the principal nitrogen-transport amino acids in most crop and higher plants including Arabidopsis thaliana. We have begun to investigate the regulatory mechanisms controlling nitrogen assimilation into these amino acids in plants using molecular and genetic approaches in Arabidopsis. The synthesis of the amide amino acids glutamine and asparagine is subject to tight regulation in response to environmental factors such as light and to metabolic factors such as sucrose and amino acids. For instance, light induces the expression of glutamine synthetase (GLN2) and represses expression of asparagine synthetase (ASN1) genes. This reciprocal regulation of GLN2 and ASN1 genes by light is reflected at the level of transcription and at the level of glutamine and asparagine biosynthesis. Moreover, we have shown that the regulation of these genes is also reciprocally controlled by both organic nitrogen and carbon metabolites. We have recently used a reverse genetic approach to study putative components of such metabolic sensing mechanisms in plants that may be conserved in evolution. These components include an Arabidopsis homolog for a glutamate receptor gene originally found in animal systems and a plant PII gene, which is a homolog of a component of the bacterial Ntr system. Based on our observations on the biology of both structural and regulatory genes of the nitrogen assimilatory pathway, we have developed a model for metabolic control of the genes involved in the nitrogen assimilatory pathway in plants.",
keywords = "Amino acids, Ammonium, Arabidopsis thaliana, Carbon, Gene expression, Nitrogen assimilation",
author = "Oliveira, {I. C.} and E. Brenner and J. Chiu and Hsieh, {M. H.} and A. Kouranov and Lam, {H. M.} and Shin, {M. J.} and G. Coruzzi",
year = "2001",
month = "5",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "34",
pages = "567--575",
journal = "Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research",
issn = "0100-879X",
publisher = "Associacao Brasileira de Divulgacao Cientifica",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Metabolite and light regulation of metabolism in plants

T2 - Lessons from the study of a single biochemical pathway

AU - Oliveira, I. C.

AU - Brenner, E.

AU - Chiu, J.

AU - Hsieh, M. H.

AU - Kouranov, A.

AU - Lam, H. M.

AU - Shin, M. J.

AU - Coruzzi, G.

PY - 2001/5

Y1 - 2001/5

N2 - We are using molecular, biochemical, and genetic approaches to study the structural and regulatory genes controlling the assimilation of inorganic nitrogen into the amino acids glutamine, glutamate, aspartate and asparagine. These amino acids serve as the principal nitrogen-transport amino acids in most crop and higher plants including Arabidopsis thaliana. We have begun to investigate the regulatory mechanisms controlling nitrogen assimilation into these amino acids in plants using molecular and genetic approaches in Arabidopsis. The synthesis of the amide amino acids glutamine and asparagine is subject to tight regulation in response to environmental factors such as light and to metabolic factors such as sucrose and amino acids. For instance, light induces the expression of glutamine synthetase (GLN2) and represses expression of asparagine synthetase (ASN1) genes. This reciprocal regulation of GLN2 and ASN1 genes by light is reflected at the level of transcription and at the level of glutamine and asparagine biosynthesis. Moreover, we have shown that the regulation of these genes is also reciprocally controlled by both organic nitrogen and carbon metabolites. We have recently used a reverse genetic approach to study putative components of such metabolic sensing mechanisms in plants that may be conserved in evolution. These components include an Arabidopsis homolog for a glutamate receptor gene originally found in animal systems and a plant PII gene, which is a homolog of a component of the bacterial Ntr system. Based on our observations on the biology of both structural and regulatory genes of the nitrogen assimilatory pathway, we have developed a model for metabolic control of the genes involved in the nitrogen assimilatory pathway in plants.

AB - We are using molecular, biochemical, and genetic approaches to study the structural and regulatory genes controlling the assimilation of inorganic nitrogen into the amino acids glutamine, glutamate, aspartate and asparagine. These amino acids serve as the principal nitrogen-transport amino acids in most crop and higher plants including Arabidopsis thaliana. We have begun to investigate the regulatory mechanisms controlling nitrogen assimilation into these amino acids in plants using molecular and genetic approaches in Arabidopsis. The synthesis of the amide amino acids glutamine and asparagine is subject to tight regulation in response to environmental factors such as light and to metabolic factors such as sucrose and amino acids. For instance, light induces the expression of glutamine synthetase (GLN2) and represses expression of asparagine synthetase (ASN1) genes. This reciprocal regulation of GLN2 and ASN1 genes by light is reflected at the level of transcription and at the level of glutamine and asparagine biosynthesis. Moreover, we have shown that the regulation of these genes is also reciprocally controlled by both organic nitrogen and carbon metabolites. We have recently used a reverse genetic approach to study putative components of such metabolic sensing mechanisms in plants that may be conserved in evolution. These components include an Arabidopsis homolog for a glutamate receptor gene originally found in animal systems and a plant PII gene, which is a homolog of a component of the bacterial Ntr system. Based on our observations on the biology of both structural and regulatory genes of the nitrogen assimilatory pathway, we have developed a model for metabolic control of the genes involved in the nitrogen assimilatory pathway in plants.

KW - Amino acids

KW - Ammonium

KW - Arabidopsis thaliana

KW - Carbon

KW - Gene expression

KW - Nitrogen assimilation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0035349791&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0035349791&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 11323742

AN - SCOPUS:0035349791

VL - 34

SP - 567

EP - 575

JO - Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research

JF - Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research

SN - 0100-879X

IS - 5

ER -