Metabolic syndrome and masked hypertension among African Americans

The Jackson Heart Study

Lisandro D. Colantonio, D. Edmund Anstey, April P. Carson, Gbenga Ogedegbe, Marwah Abdalla, Mario Sims, Daichi Shimbo, Paul Muntner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The metabolic syndrome is associated with higher ambulatory blood pressure. The authors studied the association of metabolic syndrome and masked hypertension (MHT) among African Americans with clinic-measured systolic/diastolic blood pressure (SBP/DBP) <140/90 mm Hg in the Jackson Heart Study. MHT was defined as daytime, nighttime, or 24-hour hypertension on ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Among 359 participants not taking antihypertensive medication, the metabolic syndrome was associated with MHT (prevalence ratio, 1.38; 95% confidence interval, 1.10–1.74]). When metabolic syndrome components (clinic SBP/DBP 130–139/85–89 mm Hg, abdominal obesity, impaired glucose, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high triglycerides) were analyzed separately, only clinic SBP/DBP 130–139/85–89 mm Hg was associated with MHT (prevalence ratio, 1.90; 95% confidence interval, 1.56–2.32]). The metabolic syndrome was not associated with MHT among participants not taking antihypertensive medication with SBP/DBP 130–139/85–89 and <130/85 mm Hg, separately, or among participants taking antihypertensive medication (n=393). Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring screening for MHT among African Americans should be considered based on clinic BP, not metabolic syndrome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)592-600
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Clinical Hypertension
Volume19
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017

Fingerprint

Masked Hypertension
African Americans
Antihypertensive Agents
Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring
Confidence Intervals
Blood Pressure
Hypertension
Abdominal Obesity
LDL Cholesterol
HDL Cholesterol
Triglycerides
Glucose

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Colantonio, L. D., Anstey, D. E., Carson, A. P., Ogedegbe, G., Abdalla, M., Sims, M., ... Muntner, P. (2017). Metabolic syndrome and masked hypertension among African Americans: The Jackson Heart Study. Journal of Clinical Hypertension, 19(6), 592-600. https://doi.org/10.1111/jch.12974

Metabolic syndrome and masked hypertension among African Americans : The Jackson Heart Study. / Colantonio, Lisandro D.; Anstey, D. Edmund; Carson, April P.; Ogedegbe, Gbenga; Abdalla, Marwah; Sims, Mario; Shimbo, Daichi; Muntner, Paul.

In: Journal of Clinical Hypertension, Vol. 19, No. 6, 01.06.2017, p. 592-600.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Colantonio, LD, Anstey, DE, Carson, AP, Ogedegbe, G, Abdalla, M, Sims, M, Shimbo, D & Muntner, P 2017, 'Metabolic syndrome and masked hypertension among African Americans: The Jackson Heart Study', Journal of Clinical Hypertension, vol. 19, no. 6, pp. 592-600. https://doi.org/10.1111/jch.12974
Colantonio, Lisandro D. ; Anstey, D. Edmund ; Carson, April P. ; Ogedegbe, Gbenga ; Abdalla, Marwah ; Sims, Mario ; Shimbo, Daichi ; Muntner, Paul. / Metabolic syndrome and masked hypertension among African Americans : The Jackson Heart Study. In: Journal of Clinical Hypertension. 2017 ; Vol. 19, No. 6. pp. 592-600.
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