Mercury and Freon

Temperature emulation and management for server systems

Taliver Heath, Ana Paula Centeno, Pradeep George, Luiz Ramos, Yogesh Jaluria, Ricardo Bianchini

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Abstract

    Power densities have been increasing rapidly at all levels of server systems. To counter the high temperatures resulting from these densities, systems researchers have recently started work on softwarebased thermal management. Unfortunately, research in this new area has been hindered by the limitations imposed by simulators and real measurements. In this paper, we introduce Mercury, a software suite that avoids these limitations by accurately emulating temperatures based on simple layout, hardware, and componentutilization data. Most importantly, Mercury runs the entire software stack natively, enables repeatable experiments, and allows the study of thermal emergencies without harming hardware reliability. We validate Mercury using real measurements and a widely used commercial simulator. We use Mercury to develop Freon, a system that manages thermal emergencies in a server cluster without unnecessary performance degradation. Mercury will soon become available from http://www.darklab.rutgers.edu.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Title of host publicationASPLOS XII
    Subtitle of host publicationTwelfth International Conference on Architectural Support for Programming Languages and Operating Systems
    Pages106-116
    Number of pages11
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Dec 1 2006

    Fingerprint

    Servers
    Simulators
    Hardware
    Temperature control
    Degradation
    Temperature
    Experiments
    Hot Temperature

    Keywords

    • Energy conservation
    • Server clusters
    • Temperature modeling
    • Thermal management

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Software
    • Information Systems
    • Hardware and Architecture

    Cite this

    Heath, T., Centeno, A. P., George, P., Ramos, L., Jaluria, Y., & Bianchini, R. (2006). Mercury and Freon: Temperature emulation and management for server systems. In ASPLOS XII: Twelfth International Conference on Architectural Support for Programming Languages and Operating Systems (pp. 106-116) https://doi.org/10.1145/1168857.1168872

    Mercury and Freon : Temperature emulation and management for server systems. / Heath, Taliver; Centeno, Ana Paula; George, Pradeep; Ramos, Luiz; Jaluria, Yogesh; Bianchini, Ricardo.

    ASPLOS XII: Twelfth International Conference on Architectural Support for Programming Languages and Operating Systems. 2006. p. 106-116.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Heath, T, Centeno, AP, George, P, Ramos, L, Jaluria, Y & Bianchini, R 2006, Mercury and Freon: Temperature emulation and management for server systems. in ASPLOS XII: Twelfth International Conference on Architectural Support for Programming Languages and Operating Systems. pp. 106-116. https://doi.org/10.1145/1168857.1168872
    Heath T, Centeno AP, George P, Ramos L, Jaluria Y, Bianchini R. Mercury and Freon: Temperature emulation and management for server systems. In ASPLOS XII: Twelfth International Conference on Architectural Support for Programming Languages and Operating Systems. 2006. p. 106-116 https://doi.org/10.1145/1168857.1168872
    Heath, Taliver ; Centeno, Ana Paula ; George, Pradeep ; Ramos, Luiz ; Jaluria, Yogesh ; Bianchini, Ricardo. / Mercury and Freon : Temperature emulation and management for server systems. ASPLOS XII: Twelfth International Conference on Architectural Support for Programming Languages and Operating Systems. 2006. pp. 106-116
    @inproceedings{aa3ca5e120bb413a99e3ef9fd1d1ba02,
    title = "Mercury and Freon: Temperature emulation and management for server systems",
    abstract = "Power densities have been increasing rapidly at all levels of server systems. To counter the high temperatures resulting from these densities, systems researchers have recently started work on softwarebased thermal management. Unfortunately, research in this new area has been hindered by the limitations imposed by simulators and real measurements. In this paper, we introduce Mercury, a software suite that avoids these limitations by accurately emulating temperatures based on simple layout, hardware, and componentutilization data. Most importantly, Mercury runs the entire software stack natively, enables repeatable experiments, and allows the study of thermal emergencies without harming hardware reliability. We validate Mercury using real measurements and a widely used commercial simulator. We use Mercury to develop Freon, a system that manages thermal emergencies in a server cluster without unnecessary performance degradation. Mercury will soon become available from http://www.darklab.rutgers.edu.",
    keywords = "Energy conservation, Server clusters, Temperature modeling, Thermal management",
    author = "Taliver Heath and Centeno, {Ana Paula} and Pradeep George and Luiz Ramos and Yogesh Jaluria and Ricardo Bianchini",
    year = "2006",
    month = "12",
    day = "1",
    doi = "10.1145/1168857.1168872",
    language = "English (US)",
    isbn = "1595934510",
    pages = "106--116",
    booktitle = "ASPLOS XII",

    }

    TY - GEN

    T1 - Mercury and Freon

    T2 - Temperature emulation and management for server systems

    AU - Heath, Taliver

    AU - Centeno, Ana Paula

    AU - George, Pradeep

    AU - Ramos, Luiz

    AU - Jaluria, Yogesh

    AU - Bianchini, Ricardo

    PY - 2006/12/1

    Y1 - 2006/12/1

    N2 - Power densities have been increasing rapidly at all levels of server systems. To counter the high temperatures resulting from these densities, systems researchers have recently started work on softwarebased thermal management. Unfortunately, research in this new area has been hindered by the limitations imposed by simulators and real measurements. In this paper, we introduce Mercury, a software suite that avoids these limitations by accurately emulating temperatures based on simple layout, hardware, and componentutilization data. Most importantly, Mercury runs the entire software stack natively, enables repeatable experiments, and allows the study of thermal emergencies without harming hardware reliability. We validate Mercury using real measurements and a widely used commercial simulator. We use Mercury to develop Freon, a system that manages thermal emergencies in a server cluster without unnecessary performance degradation. Mercury will soon become available from http://www.darklab.rutgers.edu.

    AB - Power densities have been increasing rapidly at all levels of server systems. To counter the high temperatures resulting from these densities, systems researchers have recently started work on softwarebased thermal management. Unfortunately, research in this new area has been hindered by the limitations imposed by simulators and real measurements. In this paper, we introduce Mercury, a software suite that avoids these limitations by accurately emulating temperatures based on simple layout, hardware, and componentutilization data. Most importantly, Mercury runs the entire software stack natively, enables repeatable experiments, and allows the study of thermal emergencies without harming hardware reliability. We validate Mercury using real measurements and a widely used commercial simulator. We use Mercury to develop Freon, a system that manages thermal emergencies in a server cluster without unnecessary performance degradation. Mercury will soon become available from http://www.darklab.rutgers.edu.

    KW - Energy conservation

    KW - Server clusters

    KW - Temperature modeling

    KW - Thermal management

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34547466206&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34547466206&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.1145/1168857.1168872

    DO - 10.1145/1168857.1168872

    M3 - Conference contribution

    SN - 1595934510

    SN - 9781595934512

    SP - 106

    EP - 116

    BT - ASPLOS XII

    ER -