Mental illness and violence: Lessons from the evidence

Sharon Glied, Richard G. Frank

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

The debate about addressing mental illness and violence often ignores key facts. Many people experience mental illnesses, so having had a diagnosed illness is not a very specific predictor of violent behavior. This means that many proposed policy approaches, from expanded screening to more institutionalization, are unlikely to be effective. Expanded access to effective treatments, although desirable, will have only modest impacts on violence rates. Most people with mental health problems do not commit violent acts, and most violent acts are not committed by people with diagnosed mental disorders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume104
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2014

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Violence
Institutionalization
Mental Disorders
Mental Health
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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Mental illness and violence : Lessons from the evidence. / Glied, Sharon; Frank, Richard G.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 104, No. 2, 02.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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