Memory consolidation for contextual and auditory fear conditioning is dependent on protein synthesis, PKA, and MAP kinase

Glenn E. Schafe, Nicole V. Nadel, Gregory M. Sullivan, Alexander Harris, Joseph Ledoux

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Fear conditioning has received extensive experimental attention. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that underlie fear memory consolidation. Previous studies have shown that long-term potentiation (LTP) exists in pathways known to be relevant to fear conditioning and that fear conditioning modifies neural processing in these pathways in a manner similar to LTP induction. The present experiments examined whether inhibition of protein synthesis, PKA, and MAP kinase activity, treatments that block LTP, also interfere with the consolidation of fear conditioning. Rats were injected intraventricularly with Anisomycin (100 or 300 μg), Rp-cAMPS (90 or 180 μg), or PD098059 (1 or 3 μg) prior to conditioning and assessed for retention of contextual and auditory fear memory both within an hour and 24 hr later. Results indicated that injection of these compounds selectively interfered with long-term memory for contextual and auditory fear, while leaving short-term memory intact. Additional control groups indicated that this effect was likely due to impaired memory consolidation rather than to nonspecific effects of the drugs on fear expression. Results suggest that fear conditioning and LTP may share common molecular mechanisms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)97-110
Number of pages14
JournalLearning and Memory
Volume6
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1999

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Fear
Phosphotransferases
Long-Term Potentiation
Proteins
Anisomycin
Memory Consolidation
Conditioning (Psychology)
Long-Term Memory
Short-Term Memory
Control Groups
Injections
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Memory consolidation for contextual and auditory fear conditioning is dependent on protein synthesis, PKA, and MAP kinase. / Schafe, Glenn E.; Nadel, Nicole V.; Sullivan, Gregory M.; Harris, Alexander; Ledoux, Joseph.

In: Learning and Memory, Vol. 6, No. 2, 1999, p. 97-110.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schafe, Glenn E. ; Nadel, Nicole V. ; Sullivan, Gregory M. ; Harris, Alexander ; Ledoux, Joseph. / Memory consolidation for contextual and auditory fear conditioning is dependent on protein synthesis, PKA, and MAP kinase. In: Learning and Memory. 1999 ; Vol. 6, No. 2. pp. 97-110.
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