Mechanisms underlying selective neuronal tracking of attended speech at a "cocktail party"

Elana M. Zion Golumbic, Nai Ding, Stephan Bickel, Peter Lakatos, Catherine A. Schevon, Guy M. McKhann, Robert R. Goodman, Ronald Emerson, Ashesh D. Mehta, Jonathan Z. Simon, David Poeppel, Charles E. Schroeder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The ability to focus on and understand one talker in a noisy social environment is a critical social-cognitive capacity, whose underlying neuronal mechanisms are unclear. We investigated the manner in which speech streams are represented in brain activity and the way that selective attention governs the brain's representation of speech using a "Cocktail Party"paradigm, coupled with direct recordings from the cortical surface in surgical epilepsy patients. We find that brain activity dynamically tracks speech streams using both low-frequency phase and high-frequency amplitude fluctuations and that optimal encoding likely combines the two. In and near low-level auditory cortices, attention "modulates"the representation by enhancing cortical tracking of attended speech streams, but ignored speech remains represented. In higher-order regions, the representation appears to become more "selective,"in that there is no detectable tracking of ignored speech. This selectivity itself seems to sharpen as a sentence unfolds.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)980-991
Number of pages12
JournalNeuron
Volume77
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

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Brain
Auditory Cortex
Aptitude
Social Environment
Epilepsy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Zion Golumbic, E. M., Ding, N., Bickel, S., Lakatos, P., Schevon, C. A., McKhann, G. M., ... Schroeder, C. E. (2013). Mechanisms underlying selective neuronal tracking of attended speech at a "cocktail party". Neuron, 77(5), 980-991. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuron.2012.12.037

Mechanisms underlying selective neuronal tracking of attended speech at a "cocktail party". / Zion Golumbic, Elana M.; Ding, Nai; Bickel, Stephan; Lakatos, Peter; Schevon, Catherine A.; McKhann, Guy M.; Goodman, Robert R.; Emerson, Ronald; Mehta, Ashesh D.; Simon, Jonathan Z.; Poeppel, David; Schroeder, Charles E.

In: Neuron, Vol. 77, No. 5, 2013, p. 980-991.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zion Golumbic, EM, Ding, N, Bickel, S, Lakatos, P, Schevon, CA, McKhann, GM, Goodman, RR, Emerson, R, Mehta, AD, Simon, JZ, Poeppel, D & Schroeder, CE 2013, 'Mechanisms underlying selective neuronal tracking of attended speech at a "cocktail party"', Neuron, vol. 77, no. 5, pp. 980-991. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuron.2012.12.037
Zion Golumbic EM, Ding N, Bickel S, Lakatos P, Schevon CA, McKhann GM et al. Mechanisms underlying selective neuronal tracking of attended speech at a "cocktail party". Neuron. 2013;77(5):980-991. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuron.2012.12.037
Zion Golumbic, Elana M. ; Ding, Nai ; Bickel, Stephan ; Lakatos, Peter ; Schevon, Catherine A. ; McKhann, Guy M. ; Goodman, Robert R. ; Emerson, Ronald ; Mehta, Ashesh D. ; Simon, Jonathan Z. ; Poeppel, David ; Schroeder, Charles E. / Mechanisms underlying selective neuronal tracking of attended speech at a "cocktail party". In: Neuron. 2013 ; Vol. 77, No. 5. pp. 980-991.
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