Mechanisms of critical period in the hippocampus underlie object location learning and memory in infant rats

Alessio Travaglia, Adam B. Steinmetz, Janelle M. Miranda, Cristina Alberini

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Episodic memories in early childhood are rapidly forgotten, a phenomenon that is associated with "infantile amnesia," the inability of adults to remember early-life experiences. We recently showed that early aversive contextual memory in infant rats, which is in fact rapidly forgotten, is actually not lost, as reminders presented later in life reinstate a long-lasting and context-specific memory. We also showed that the formation of this infantile memory recruits in the hippocampus mechanisms typical of developmental critical periods. Here, we tested whether similar mechanisms apply to a nonaversive, hippocampal type of learning. We report that novel object location (nOL) learned at postnatal day 17 (PN17) undergoes the typical rapid forgetting of infantile learning. However, a later reminder reinstates memory expression. Furthermore, as for aversive experiences, nOL learning at PN17 engages critical period mechanisms in the dorsal hippocampus: it induces a switch in the GluN2A/2B-NMDA receptor ratio, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor injected bilaterally into the dorsal hippocampus immediately after training results in long-lasting memory expression. We conclude that in infancy the hippocampus plays a necessary role in processing episodic and contextual memories, including nonaversive ones, and matures through a developmental critical period.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)176-182
Number of pages7
JournalLearning and Memory
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2018

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Hippocampus
Learning
Episodic Memory
trkB Receptor
Amnesia
N-Methylaspartate
Critical Period (Psychology)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Mechanisms of critical period in the hippocampus underlie object location learning and memory in infant rats. / Travaglia, Alessio; Steinmetz, Adam B.; Miranda, Janelle M.; Alberini, Cristina.

In: Learning and Memory, Vol. 25, No. 4, 01.04.2018, p. 176-182.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Travaglia, Alessio ; Steinmetz, Adam B. ; Miranda, Janelle M. ; Alberini, Cristina. / Mechanisms of critical period in the hippocampus underlie object location learning and memory in infant rats. In: Learning and Memory. 2018 ; Vol. 25, No. 4. pp. 176-182.
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