Mayor Edward I. Koch and New york’s municipal foreign policy, 1977-1990

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Democratic mayoral nominee Ed Koch wanted a public showdown with Jimmy Carter when the president came to New York to endorse him in October 1977.1 Koch believed that Carter had made "a complete sellout of Israe" by pursuing a joint declaration with the Soviet Union calling for a multilateral Middle East peace conference in Geneva, which aimed at the creation of a Palestinian state. As Carter disembarked at the LaGuardia heliport to meet the press, Ed Koch was there with a surprise: a letter that he had already distributed to the media surrounding the president.2 Photos of the event show Koch eye-to-eye with the much-shorter Carter, who was standing on a platform. Incumbent Mayor Abraham D. Beame, a former bureaucrat who was famously orthodox when it came to political manners, looked up at them uneasily; his eyes were focused on the letter. The mayoral candidate had been scheduled to drive back into the city with the president. Instead, Carter stranded him on the tarmac.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAnother Global City: Historical Explorations into the Transnational Municipal Moment, 1850-2000
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
Pages119-133
Number of pages15
ISBN (Electronic)9780230613812
ISBN (Print)9780230606630
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2008

Fingerprint

Foreign Policy
Letters
Declaration
Surprise
Middle East
Incumbents
Palestinians
Soviet Union
Peace
Geneva

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities(all)

Cite this

Soffer, J. (2008). Mayor Edward I. Koch and New york’s municipal foreign policy, 1977-1990. In Another Global City: Historical Explorations into the Transnational Municipal Moment, 1850-2000 (pp. 119-133). Palgrave Macmillan. https://doi.org/10.1057/9780230613812_8

Mayor Edward I. Koch and New york’s municipal foreign policy, 1977-1990. / Soffer, Jonathan.

Another Global City: Historical Explorations into the Transnational Municipal Moment, 1850-2000. Palgrave Macmillan, 2008. p. 119-133.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Soffer, J 2008, Mayor Edward I. Koch and New york’s municipal foreign policy, 1977-1990. in Another Global City: Historical Explorations into the Transnational Municipal Moment, 1850-2000. Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 119-133. https://doi.org/10.1057/9780230613812_8
Soffer J. Mayor Edward I. Koch and New york’s municipal foreign policy, 1977-1990. In Another Global City: Historical Explorations into the Transnational Municipal Moment, 1850-2000. Palgrave Macmillan. 2008. p. 119-133 https://doi.org/10.1057/9780230613812_8
Soffer, Jonathan. / Mayor Edward I. Koch and New york’s municipal foreign policy, 1977-1990. Another Global City: Historical Explorations into the Transnational Municipal Moment, 1850-2000. Palgrave Macmillan, 2008. pp. 119-133
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