Maximum averaged and peak levels of vocal sound pressure

Braxton Boren, Agnieszka Roginska, Brian Gill

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

This work describes research on the maximum sound pressure level achievable by the spoken and sung human voice. Trained actors and singers were measured for peak and averaged SPLs at an on-axis distance of 1 m at three different subjective dynamic levels and also for two different vocal techniques ('back' and 'mask' voices). The 'back' sung voice was found to achieve a consistently lower SPL than the 'mask' voice at a corresponding dynamic level. Some singers were able to achieve high averaged levels with both spoken and sung voice, while others produced much higher levels singing than speaking. A few of the vocalists were able to produce averaged levels above 90 dBA, the highest found in the existing literature.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication135th Audio Engineering Society Convention 2013
PublisherAudio Engineering Society
Pages692-698
Number of pages7
StatePublished - 2013
Event135th Audio Engineering Society Convention 2013 - New York, NY, United States
Duration: Oct 17 2013Oct 20 2013

Other

Other135th Audio Engineering Society Convention 2013
CountryUnited States
CityNew York, NY
Period10/17/1310/20/13

Fingerprint

sound pressure
masks

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

Cite this

Boren, B., Roginska, A., & Gill, B. (2013). Maximum averaged and peak levels of vocal sound pressure. In 135th Audio Engineering Society Convention 2013 (pp. 692-698). Audio Engineering Society.

Maximum averaged and peak levels of vocal sound pressure. / Boren, Braxton; Roginska, Agnieszka; Gill, Brian.

135th Audio Engineering Society Convention 2013. Audio Engineering Society, 2013. p. 692-698.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Boren, B, Roginska, A & Gill, B 2013, Maximum averaged and peak levels of vocal sound pressure. in 135th Audio Engineering Society Convention 2013. Audio Engineering Society, pp. 692-698, 135th Audio Engineering Society Convention 2013, New York, NY, United States, 10/17/13.
Boren B, Roginska A, Gill B. Maximum averaged and peak levels of vocal sound pressure. In 135th Audio Engineering Society Convention 2013. Audio Engineering Society. 2013. p. 692-698
Boren, Braxton ; Roginska, Agnieszka ; Gill, Brian. / Maximum averaged and peak levels of vocal sound pressure. 135th Audio Engineering Society Convention 2013. Audio Engineering Society, 2013. pp. 692-698
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