Maternal sensitivity is related to hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis stress reactivity and regulation in response to emotion challenge in 6-month-old infants

Clancy Blair, Douglas Granger, Michael Willoughby, Katie Kivlighan

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

This study examined relations between maternal sensitivity as observed in a free play interaction and changes in levels of the glucocorticoid hormone cortisol in response to procedures designed to elicit negative affect in 6-month old infants. The sample included 1,292 families in predominantly rural and low-income communities in Pennsylvania and North Carolina. Results indicated that infants of more sensitive mothers had lower levels of cortisol at baseline and increased cortisol reactivity and regulation in response to the emotion procedures. Maternal negativity was unrelated to infant cortisol. Findings highlight the need for further research on variation in early caregiving and the development of the stress response in young children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationResilience in Children
Pages263-267
Number of pages5
Volume1094
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2006

Publication series

NameAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Volume1094
ISSN (Print)00778923
ISSN (Electronic)17496632

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Hydrocortisone
Emotions
Mothers
Glucocorticoids
Hormones
Research

Keywords

  • Emotion
  • Parenting
  • Stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Blair, C., Granger, D., Willoughby, M., & Kivlighan, K. (2006). Maternal sensitivity is related to hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis stress reactivity and regulation in response to emotion challenge in 6-month-old infants. In Resilience in Children (Vol. 1094, pp. 263-267). (Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences; Vol. 1094). https://doi.org/10.1196/annals.1376.031

Maternal sensitivity is related to hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis stress reactivity and regulation in response to emotion challenge in 6-month-old infants. / Blair, Clancy; Granger, Douglas; Willoughby, Michael; Kivlighan, Katie.

Resilience in Children. Vol. 1094 2006. p. 263-267 (Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences; Vol. 1094).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Blair, C, Granger, D, Willoughby, M & Kivlighan, K 2006, Maternal sensitivity is related to hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis stress reactivity and regulation in response to emotion challenge in 6-month-old infants. in Resilience in Children. vol. 1094, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, vol. 1094, pp. 263-267. https://doi.org/10.1196/annals.1376.031
Blair C, Granger D, Willoughby M, Kivlighan K. Maternal sensitivity is related to hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis stress reactivity and regulation in response to emotion challenge in 6-month-old infants. In Resilience in Children. Vol. 1094. 2006. p. 263-267. (Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences). https://doi.org/10.1196/annals.1376.031
Blair, Clancy ; Granger, Douglas ; Willoughby, Michael ; Kivlighan, Katie. / Maternal sensitivity is related to hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis stress reactivity and regulation in response to emotion challenge in 6-month-old infants. Resilience in Children. Vol. 1094 2006. pp. 263-267 (Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences).
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