Maternal morbidity during childbirth hospitalization in California

Audrey Lyndon, Henry C. Lee, William M. Gilbert, Jeffrey B. Gould, Kathryn A. Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To determine the incidence and risk factors for maternal morbidity during childbirth hospitalization. Methods: Maternal morbidities were determined using ICD9-CM and vital records codes from linked hospital discharge and vital records data for 1,572,909 singleton births in California during 2005-2007. Socio-demographic, obstetric and hospital volume risk factors were estimated using mixed effects logistic regression models. Results: The maternal morbidity rate was 241/1000 births. The most common morbidities were episiotomy, pelvic trauma, maternal infection, postpartum hemorrhage and severe laceration. Preeclampsia (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 2.96; 95% confidence interval 2.8,3.13), maternal age over 35 years, (AOR: 1.92; 1.79,2.06), vaginal birth after cesarean, (AOR: 1.81; 1.47,2.23) and repeat cesarean birth (AOR: 1.99; 1.87,2.12) conferred the highest odds of severe morbidity. Non-white women were more likely to suffer morbidity. Conclusions: Nearly one in four California women experienced complications during childbirth hospitalization. Significant health disparities in maternal childbirth outcomes persist in the USA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2529-2535
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine
Volume25
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2012

Fingerprint

Hospitalization
Mothers
Parturition
Morbidity
Odds Ratio
Vaginal Birth after Cesarean
Logistic Models
Episiotomy
Postpartum Hemorrhage
Lacerations
Maternal Age
Pre-Eclampsia
Obstetrics
Demography
Confidence Intervals
Incidence
Health
Wounds and Injuries
Infection

Keywords

  • Childbirth hospitalization
  • Maternal morbidity
  • Risk factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Maternal morbidity during childbirth hospitalization in California. / Lyndon, Audrey; Lee, Henry C.; Gilbert, William M.; Gould, Jeffrey B.; Lee, Kathryn A.

In: Journal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine, Vol. 25, No. 12, 01.12.2012, p. 2529-2535.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lyndon, Audrey ; Lee, Henry C. ; Gilbert, William M. ; Gould, Jeffrey B. ; Lee, Kathryn A. / Maternal morbidity during childbirth hospitalization in California. In: Journal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine. 2012 ; Vol. 25, No. 12. pp. 2529-2535.
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