Material resources and population health: disadvantages in health care, housing, and food among adults over 50 years of age.

Dawn E. Alley, Beth J. Soldo, Jose Pagan, John McCabe, Madeleine DeBlois, Samuel H. Field, David A. Asch, Carolyn Cannuscio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: We examined associations between material resources and late-life declines in health. METHODS: We used logistic regression to estimate the odds of declines in self-rated health and incident walking limitations associated with material disadvantages in a prospective panel representative of US adults aged 51 years and older (N = 15,441). RESULTS: Disadvantages in health care (odds ratio [OR] = 1.39; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.23, 1.58), food (OR = 1.69; 95% CI = 1.29, 2.22), and housing (OR = 1.20; 95% CI = 1.07, 1.35) were independently associated with declines in self-rated health, whereas only health care (OR = 1.43; 95% CI = 1.29, 1.58) and food (OR = 1.64; 95% CI = 1.31, 2.05) disadvantage predicted incident walking limitations. Participants experiencing multiple material disadvantages were particularly susceptible to worsening health and functional decline. These effects were sustained after we controlled for numerous covariates, including baseline health status and comorbidities. The relations between health declines and non-Hispanic Black race/ethnicity, poverty, marital status, and education were attenuated or eliminated after we controlled for material disadvantage. CONCLUSIONS: Material disadvantages, which are highly policy relevant, appear related to health in ways not captured by education and poverty. Policies to improve health should address a range of basic human needs, rather than health care alone.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume99 Suppl 3
StatePublished - Nov 2009

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Health Resources
Delivery of Health Care
Food
Health
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Population
Poverty
Walking
Education
Marital Status
Health Status
Comorbidity
Logistic Models

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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Material resources and population health : disadvantages in health care, housing, and food among adults over 50 years of age. / Alley, Dawn E.; Soldo, Beth J.; Pagan, Jose; McCabe, John; DeBlois, Madeleine; Field, Samuel H.; Asch, David A.; Cannuscio, Carolyn.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 99 Suppl 3, 11.2009.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Alley, Dawn E. ; Soldo, Beth J. ; Pagan, Jose ; McCabe, John ; DeBlois, Madeleine ; Field, Samuel H. ; Asch, David A. ; Cannuscio, Carolyn. / Material resources and population health : disadvantages in health care, housing, and food among adults over 50 years of age. In: American Journal of Public Health. 2009 ; Vol. 99 Suppl 3.
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