Manufacturing and Security Challenges in 3D Printing

Steven Eric Zeltmann, Nikhil Gupta, Nektarios Georgios Tsoutsos, Mihalis Maniatakos, Jeyavijayan Rajendran, Ramesh Karri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

As the manufacturing time, quality, and cost associated with additive manufacturing (AM) continue to improve, more and more businesses and consumers are adopting this technology. Some of the key benefits of AM include customizing products, localizing production and reducing logistics. Due to these and numerous other benefits, AM is enabling a globally distributed manufacturing process and supply chain spanning multiple parties, and hence raises concerns about the reliability of the manufactured product. In this work, we first present a brief overview of the potential risks that exist in the cyber-physical environment of additive manufacturing. We then evaluate the risks posed by two different classes of modifications to the AM process which are representative of the challenges that are unique to AM. The risks posed are examined through mechanical testing of objects with altered printing orientation and fine internal defects. Finite element analysis and ultrasonic inspection are also used to demonstrate the potential for decreased performance and for evading detection. The results highlight several scenarios, intentional or unintentional, that can affect the product quality and pose security challenges for the additive manufacturing supply chain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalJOM
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - May 11 2016

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3D printers
Printing
Supply chains
Mechanical testing
Logistics
Inspection
Ultrasonics
Finite element method
Defects

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)
  • Materials Science(all)

Cite this

Zeltmann, S. E., Gupta, N., Tsoutsos, N. G., Maniatakos, M., Rajendran, J., & Karri, R. (Accepted/In press). Manufacturing and Security Challenges in 3D Printing. JOM, 1-10. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11837-016-1937-7

Manufacturing and Security Challenges in 3D Printing. / Zeltmann, Steven Eric; Gupta, Nikhil; Tsoutsos, Nektarios Georgios; Maniatakos, Mihalis; Rajendran, Jeyavijayan; Karri, Ramesh.

In: JOM, 11.05.2016, p. 1-10.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zeltmann, SE, Gupta, N, Tsoutsos, NG, Maniatakos, M, Rajendran, J & Karri, R 2016, 'Manufacturing and Security Challenges in 3D Printing', JOM, pp. 1-10. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11837-016-1937-7
Zeltmann, Steven Eric ; Gupta, Nikhil ; Tsoutsos, Nektarios Georgios ; Maniatakos, Mihalis ; Rajendran, Jeyavijayan ; Karri, Ramesh. / Manufacturing and Security Challenges in 3D Printing. In: JOM. 2016 ; pp. 1-10.
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