Manufacturable extremal low-dielectric, high-stiffness porous materials

S. Torquato, Aleksandar Donev, A. G. Evans, C. J. Brinker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The drive toward increased semiconductor device densities and improved performance has set in motion the search for low-dielectric-constant materials. While introducing porosity in silica holds promise for reducing the dielectric constant, it remains elusive how to accomplish this without seriously degrading the thermomechanical performance. This article demonstrates a contemporary protocol for materials by design. Applying rigorous cross-property relations, we identify the extremal porous material structure that possesses the desired reduction in the dielectric constant while providing the highest possible stiffness for any given level of porosity. This structural design is crucial to the integration of porous low-dielectric materials into microelectronics and should serve as a guide to future synthetic efforts. Using recently developed self-assembly techniques, we also demonstrate that structures approaching the optimal one can be fabricated. Importantly, our procedure can be applied to general material design problems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number124103
JournalJournal of Applied Physics
Volume97
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005

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porous materials
stiffness
permittivity
porosity
structural design
semiconductor devices
microelectronics
self assembly
silicon dioxide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy (miscellaneous)
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Manufacturable extremal low-dielectric, high-stiffness porous materials. / Torquato, S.; Donev, Aleksandar; Evans, A. G.; Brinker, C. J.

In: Journal of Applied Physics, Vol. 97, No. 12, 124103, 2005.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Torquato, S. ; Donev, Aleksandar ; Evans, A. G. ; Brinker, C. J. / Manufacturable extremal low-dielectric, high-stiffness porous materials. In: Journal of Applied Physics. 2005 ; Vol. 97, No. 12.
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