Malaria in India

The Center for the Study of Complex Malaria in India

Aparup Das, Anupkumar R. Anvikar, Lauren J. Cator, Ramesh C. Dhiman, Alex Eapen, Neelima Mishra, Bhupinder N. Nagpal, Nutan Nanda, Kamaraju Raghavendra, Andrew F. Read, Surya K. Sharma, Om P. Singh, Vineeta Singh, Photini Sinnis, Harish C. Srivastava, Steven A. Sullivan, Patrick L. Sutton, Matthew B. Thomas, Jane M. Carlton, Neena Valecha

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Malaria is a major public health problem in India and one which contributes significantly to the overall malaria burden in Southeast Asia. The National Vector Borne Disease Control Program of India reported ∼1.6 million cases and ∼1100 malaria deaths in 2009. Some experts argue that this is a serious underestimation and that the actual number of malaria cases per year is likely between 9 and 50 times greater, with an approximate 13-fold underestimation of malaria-related mortality. The difficulty in making these estimations is further exacerbated by (i) highly variable malaria eco-epidemiological profiles, (ii) the transmission and overlap of multiple Plasmodium species and Anopheles vectors, (iii) increasing antimalarial drug resistance and insecticide resistance, and (iv) the impact of climate change on each of these variables. Simply stated, the burden of malaria in India is complex. Here we describe plans for a Center for the Study of Complex Malaria in India (CSCMi), one of ten International Centers of Excellence in Malaria Research (ICEMRs) located in malarious regions of the world recently funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health. The CSCMi is a close partnership between Indian and United States scientists, and aims to address major gaps in our understanding of the complexity of malaria in India, including changing patterns of epidemiology, vector biology and control, drug resistance, and parasite genomics. We hope that such a multidisciplinary approach that integrates clinical and field studies with laboratory, molecular, and genomic methods will provide a powerful combination for malaria control and prevention in India.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)267-273
Number of pages7
JournalActa Tropica
Volume121
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2012

Fingerprint

malaria
Malaria
India
drug resistance
Drug Resistance
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (U.S.)
Insecticide Resistance
disease control programs
Communicable Disease Control
National Institutes of Health
genomics
Disease Vectors
vector-borne diseases
Southeastern Asia
Anopheles
antimalarials
Plasmodium
Climate Change
insecticide resistance
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)

Keywords

  • Anopheles
  • Epidemiology
  • Genomics
  • India
  • Malaria
  • Plasmodium

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Das, A., Anvikar, A. R., Cator, L. J., Dhiman, R. C., Eapen, A., Mishra, N., ... Valecha, N. (2012). Malaria in India: The Center for the Study of Complex Malaria in India. Acta Tropica, 121(3), 267-273. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.actatropica.2011.11.008

Malaria in India : The Center for the Study of Complex Malaria in India. / Das, Aparup; Anvikar, Anupkumar R.; Cator, Lauren J.; Dhiman, Ramesh C.; Eapen, Alex; Mishra, Neelima; Nagpal, Bhupinder N.; Nanda, Nutan; Raghavendra, Kamaraju; Read, Andrew F.; Sharma, Surya K.; Singh, Om P.; Singh, Vineeta; Sinnis, Photini; Srivastava, Harish C.; Sullivan, Steven A.; Sutton, Patrick L.; Thomas, Matthew B.; Carlton, Jane M.; Valecha, Neena.

In: Acta Tropica, Vol. 121, No. 3, 03.2012, p. 267-273.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Das, A, Anvikar, AR, Cator, LJ, Dhiman, RC, Eapen, A, Mishra, N, Nagpal, BN, Nanda, N, Raghavendra, K, Read, AF, Sharma, SK, Singh, OP, Singh, V, Sinnis, P, Srivastava, HC, Sullivan, SA, Sutton, PL, Thomas, MB, Carlton, JM & Valecha, N 2012, 'Malaria in India: The Center for the Study of Complex Malaria in India', Acta Tropica, vol. 121, no. 3, pp. 267-273. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.actatropica.2011.11.008
Das A, Anvikar AR, Cator LJ, Dhiman RC, Eapen A, Mishra N et al. Malaria in India: The Center for the Study of Complex Malaria in India. Acta Tropica. 2012 Mar;121(3):267-273. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.actatropica.2011.11.008
Das, Aparup ; Anvikar, Anupkumar R. ; Cator, Lauren J. ; Dhiman, Ramesh C. ; Eapen, Alex ; Mishra, Neelima ; Nagpal, Bhupinder N. ; Nanda, Nutan ; Raghavendra, Kamaraju ; Read, Andrew F. ; Sharma, Surya K. ; Singh, Om P. ; Singh, Vineeta ; Sinnis, Photini ; Srivastava, Harish C. ; Sullivan, Steven A. ; Sutton, Patrick L. ; Thomas, Matthew B. ; Carlton, Jane M. ; Valecha, Neena. / Malaria in India : The Center for the Study of Complex Malaria in India. In: Acta Tropica. 2012 ; Vol. 121, No. 3. pp. 267-273.
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