Making it harder to smoke and easier to quit: The effect of 10 years of tobacco control in New York city

Elizabeth A. Kilgore, Jenna Mandel-Ricci, Michael Johns, Micaela H. Coady, Sarah B. Perl, Andrew Goodman, Susan M. Kansagra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In 2002, New York City implemented a comprehensive tobacco control plan that discouraged smoking through excise taxes and smoke-free air laws and facilitated quitting through population-wide cessation services and hard-hitting media campaigns. Following the implementation of these activities through a well-funded and politically supported program, the adult smoking rate declined by 28% from 2002 to 2012, and the youth smoking rate declined by 52% from 2001 to 2011. These improvements indicate that local jurisdictions can have a significant positive effect on tobacco control.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume104
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Smoke
Tobacco
Smoking
Taxes
Air
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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Making it harder to smoke and easier to quit : The effect of 10 years of tobacco control in New York city. / Kilgore, Elizabeth A.; Mandel-Ricci, Jenna; Johns, Michael; Coady, Micaela H.; Perl, Sarah B.; Goodman, Andrew; Kansagra, Susan M.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 104, No. 6, 2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kilgore, Elizabeth A. ; Mandel-Ricci, Jenna ; Johns, Michael ; Coady, Micaela H. ; Perl, Sarah B. ; Goodman, Andrew ; Kansagra, Susan M. / Making it harder to smoke and easier to quit : The effect of 10 years of tobacco control in New York city. In: American Journal of Public Health. 2014 ; Vol. 104, No. 6.
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