Making infrastructure competitive in an urban world

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The infrastructure of the future provides the opportunity for new innovations to meet the constantly changing and diversified needs of cities. Some of the relatively more recent needs are using renewable resources, protecting infrastructure and its users against natural hazards, reducing environmental threats including global warming, enhancing safety and security, and providing an overall high-performing service for infrastructure users. Given that resources to support these additional financial needs and services are limited, this article will examine ways in which cities can address the demands of these new emerging areas synergistically as well as through more traditional investments. In particular, traditional investment areas for upgrading urban infrastructure to meet "state-of-good-repair" benchmarks are presented for energy, transportation, and water as a foundation for conceptualizing how these new demands might alter, yet dovetail with, traditional investment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)226-241
Number of pages16
JournalAnnals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
Volume626
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2009

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infrastructure
renewable resources
threat
innovation
energy
water
resources

Keywords

  • Energy
  • Infrastructure investment
  • Natural hazards
  • Renewable energy
  • Security
  • Transportation
  • Urban infrastructure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Making infrastructure competitive in an urban world. / Zimmerman, Rae.

In: Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Vol. 626, No. 1, 11.2009, p. 226-241.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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